Difference between revisions of "The Milky Way UK"

From Medfilm
Jump to: navigation, search
m (Enregistré en utilisant le bouton "Sauvegarder et continuer" du formulaire)
 
(103 intermediate revisions by 2 users not shown)
Line 2: Line 2:
 
|Titre=The Milky Way UK
 
|Titre=The Milky Way UK
 
|Année de production=1948
 
|Année de production=1948
|Fiche_ERC=Non
+
|Fiche_ERC=Oui
 
|Format film=16 mm;
 
|Format film=16 mm;
 
|Format couleur=Noir et blanc
 
|Format couleur=Noir et blanc
Line 14: Line 14:
 
|Archives détentrices=Wellcome Collection;
 
|Archives détentrices=Wellcome Collection;
 
|Genre dominant=Documentaire
 
|Genre dominant=Documentaire
 +
|Administration de la notice=Tricia Close-Koenig;
 
|Durée=35
 
|Durée=35
 
|Clé de tri=Milky Way UK
 
|Clé de tri=Milky Way UK
 
|Vidéo sur FTP=the_milky_way_UK
 
|Vidéo sur FTP=the_milky_way_UK
 
|Audience=Nationale
 
|Audience=Nationale
|État de la fiche=Ébauche
+
|État de la fiche=Validée
 +
|Orthographe=Non
 
|Diffusion=Cinéma
 
|Diffusion=Cinéma
 
|Avertissements=Standard
 
|Avertissements=Standard
Line 31: Line 33:
 
|Musique et bruitages=Oui
 
|Musique et bruitages=Oui
 
|Images communes avec d'autres films=Non
 
|Images communes avec d'autres films=Non
 +
|Traducteurs_fiche_fr=Élisabeth Fuchs;
 
|Sujet={{HT_Sujet
 
|Sujet={{HT_Sujet
 
|Langue=fr
 
|Langue=fr
|Texte=THE MILKY WAY. Direction Donald Rawlings. Camera J. E. Ewins. Supervision A. V. Curtice. Sound Peter Birch, R. A. Smith. Produced for United Dairies Limited by Wallace Productions Limited.
 
 
}}
 
}}
 
|Générique principal={{HT_Gén
 
|Générique principal={{HT_Gén
 
|Langue=en
 
|Langue=en
 +
|Texte=THE MILKY WAY. Direction Donald Rawlings. Camera J. E. Ewins. Supervision A. V. Curtice. Sound Peter Birch, R. A. Smith. Produced for United Dairies Limited by Wallace Productions Limited.
 +
}}{{HT_Gén
 +
|Langue=fr
 
|Texte=THE MILKY WAY. Direction Donald Rawlings. Camera J. E. Ewins. Supervision A. V. Curtice. Sound Peter Birch, R. A. Smith. Produced for United Dairies Limited by Wallace Productions Limited.
 
|Texte=THE MILKY WAY. Direction Donald Rawlings. Camera J. E. Ewins. Supervision A. V. Curtice. Sound Peter Birch, R. A. Smith. Produced for United Dairies Limited by Wallace Productions Limited.
 
}}
 
}}
Line 42: Line 47:
 
|Langue=en
 
|Langue=en
 
|Texte=FROM THE WELLCOME COLLECTION CATALOGUE "A comprehensive look at 'the milky way' - the process of milk delivery from cattle breeding to milk delivery on the doorstep. Having explained the need for pasteurisation, the film thoroughly illustrates the entire process: milking under hygienic conditions; delivery to country depots for testing; to processing depots for pasteurising; to central laboratory for final examination and bottling; to distribution depots; and, finally, delivery. The narration reminds viewers to rinse and return empty bottles (the film is sponsored by United Dairies) and then offers a glimpse of the washing process. Similarly viewers are reminded that, during World War II, pasteurised milk was vital to children's health. Stereotypes of British housewives in the 1940s appear throughout. This is offset with some good laboratory shots of female technicians testing milk quality."
 
|Texte=FROM THE WELLCOME COLLECTION CATALOGUE "A comprehensive look at 'the milky way' - the process of milk delivery from cattle breeding to milk delivery on the doorstep. Having explained the need for pasteurisation, the film thoroughly illustrates the entire process: milking under hygienic conditions; delivery to country depots for testing; to processing depots for pasteurising; to central laboratory for final examination and bottling; to distribution depots; and, finally, delivery. The narration reminds viewers to rinse and return empty bottles (the film is sponsored by United Dairies) and then offers a glimpse of the washing process. Similarly viewers are reminded that, during World War II, pasteurised milk was vital to children's health. Stereotypes of British housewives in the 1940s appear throughout. This is offset with some good laboratory shots of female technicians testing milk quality."
 +
}}{{HT_Rés
 +
|Langue=fr
 +
|Texte=D'APRÈS LE CATALOGUE DE LA WELLCOME COLLECTION ː "Une revue détaillée de la "voie lactée" - de l'élevage du bétail à la livraison du lait sur le pas de la porte des clients. Après avoir expliqué pourquoi la pasteurisation est nécessaire, le film décrit tout le processus de façon exhaustive ː la traite dans de bonnes conditions sanitaires ; la livraison dans les dépôts du comté où le lait est testé ; la pasteurisation dans d'autres dépôts ; les derniers tests dans un laboratoire central, et l'embouteillage ; les dépôts de distribution ; et enfin, la livraison. Le commentaire rappelle aux spectateurs la nécessité de retourner les bouteilles après les avoir rincées (le film est financé par ''United Dairies'') et montre le nettoyage des bouteilles. De même, il rappelle que pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale, le lait pasteurisé a joué un rôle crucial pour la santé des enfants. Des stéréotypes sur les femmes au foyer britanniques des années 1940 apparaissent tout au long du film. Ils sont contrebalancés par un certain nombre de plans de bonne qualité sur des techniciennes de laboratoire en train de tester la qualité du lait.
 
}}
 
}}
 
|Contexte={{HT_Cont
 
|Contexte={{HT_Cont
 
|Langue=en
 
|Langue=en
|Texte=This film on milk does not treat the question of nutrition. Like many sponsored industrial films, this film takes us to rural landscapes and inside factories that we would might not otherwise have a chance to visit. The topics of the film reflect the concerns of those working in dairy research and dairy production: agriculture, animal husbandry, animal health, increased production, and making milk safe by preventing spoilage and transmission of bovine tuberculosis. As a film produced by the dairy industry, it educated consumers where milk came from and on the lengths taken by the dairy industry to ensure that milk was safe for consumption. Here the dairy industry does not attempt to sell milk for its nutritive value.
+
|Texte=This film on milk does not treat the question of nutrition. Like many sponsored industrial films, this film takes us to rural landscapes and inside factories that we would might not otherwise have a chance to visit. The topics of the film reflect the concerns of those working in dairy research and dairy production: agriculture, animal husbandry, animal health, increased production, and making milk safe by preventing spoilage and transmission of bovine tuberculosis. As a film produced by the dairy industry, it educated consumers where milk came from and on the lengths taken by the dairy industry to ensure that milk was safe for consumption. Here the dairy industry does not attempt to sell milk for its nutritive value.<br />
The Milky Way was produced in 1948. It was estimated that 31 gallons of liquid milk per head were consumed on average by every individual in Great Britian in 1949 and that approximately 5 % of the total population of the country was supported by the dairy industry. At this time, notable discourse came on one hand from many acting against processing of milk, such as Lady Eve Balfour, author of the seminal volume on organic farming and the organic movement, The Living Soil (Faber & Faber, 1943 - its eighth edition published in 1948) who was particularly critical of pasteurisation. On the other, the medical bodies that pasteurisation increased in the 1940s, such as the Medical Research Council and Sir Graham Selby Wilson, bacteriologist at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, author of the landmark volume The Pasteurisation of Milk (Arnold, 1942) who developed the phosphatase test and promoted the merits of pasteurisation. The film notably features an animation to explain the HTST (High temperature short time) pasteurisation method introduced to Britain in the 1940s, a more efficient method than those used in the 1920s and 1930s.   
+
The Milky Way was produced in 1948. It was estimated that 31 gallons of liquid milk per head were consumed on average by every individual in Great Britian in 1949 and that approximately 5 % of the total population of the country was supported by the dairy industry. At this time, notable discourse came on one hand from many acting against processing of milk, such as Lady Eve Balfour, author of the seminal volume on organic farming and the organic movement, The Living Soil (Faber & Faber, 1943 - its eighth edition published in 1948) who was particularly critical of pasteurisation. On the other, the medical bodies that pasteurisation increased in the 1940s, such as the Medical Research Council and Sir Graham Selby Wilson, bacteriologist at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, author of the landmark volume The Pasteurisation of Milk (Arnold, 1942) who developed the phosphatase test and promoted the merits of pasteurisation. The film notably features an animation to explain the HTST (High temperature short time) pasteurisation method introduced to Britain in the 1940s, a more efficient method than those used in the 1920s and 1930s.  <br />
Pasteurization was debated in Britain from 1900 to 1945. Anti-pasteurisation activists were notably sceptical of modern technology adamantly opposed pasteurisation, as well as the use of fertilisers, chemicals and mechanised cultivation which would degrade soil fertility, while the medical sphere supported pasteurisation as a means to fight non-pulmonary tuberculosis (by ending the transmission of bovine tuberculosis) and the dairy industry saw pasteurisation as a means to extend the shelf-life of milk.  
+
Pasteurization was debated in Britain from 1900 to 1945. Anti-pasteurisation activists were notably sceptical of modern technology adamantly opposed pasteurisation, as well as the use of fertilisers, chemicals and mechanised cultivation which would degrade soil fertility, while the medical sphere supported pasteurisation as a means to fight non-pulmonary tuberculosis (by ending the transmission of bovine tuberculosis) and the dairy industry saw pasteurisation as a means to extend the shelf-life of milk. <br />
In 1942, the Ministry of Agriculture implemented the National Milk Testing and Advisory Scheme. And after 1945, pasteurisation became increasingly common. (It became compulsory in Scotland in 1983, but never in England or Wales.)
+
In 1942, the Ministry of Agriculture implemented the National Milk Testing and Advisory Scheme. And after 1945, pasteurisation became increasingly common. (It became compulsory in Scotland in 1983, but never in England or Wales.)<br />
The film comes as a clear argument for pasteurisation with Mrs Harris representing the British population that was sceptical of modern technology and perceived a threat in unnatural or processed foods. The film demonstrates that this view to be rife with erroneous beliefs, and Mrs Harris is, like the spectator, enlightened by the film. The film argues modern (good) versus traditional (poor) practices. This however, does not directly address the ongoing argument for organic and natural food, which remained a strong movement in Britain.
+
The film comes as a clear argument for pasteurisation with Mrs Harris representing the British population that was sceptical of modern technology and perceived a threat in unnatural or processed foods. The film demonstrates that this view to be rife with erroneous beliefs, and Mrs Harris is, like the spectator, enlightened by the film. The film argues modern (good) versus traditional (poor) practices. This however, does not directly address the ongoing argument for organic and natural food, which remained a strong movement in Britain.<br />
 
United Dairies, formed upon the merging of a few smaller dairies in 1915, and based out of Wiltshire was one of the largest dairies in the United Kingdom by the 1950s; They acted for the sale of pasteurised milk from the 1920s. The company was also a large user of milk trains (like its competitor Express Milk) to transport milk to London.
 
United Dairies, formed upon the merging of a few smaller dairies in 1915, and based out of Wiltshire was one of the largest dairies in the United Kingdom by the 1950s; They acted for the sale of pasteurised milk from the 1920s. The company was also a large user of milk trains (like its competitor Express Milk) to transport milk to London.
 +
}}{{HT_Cont
 +
|Langue=fr
 +
|Texte=Ce film ne parle pas de nutrition. Comme de nombreux films industriels de commande, il donne à voir des paysages ruraux et l'intérieur d'usines que nous n'aurions peut-être jamais la possibilité de visiter autrement. Les thèmes du film reflètent les préoccupations des personnes impliquées dans la recherche sur le lait et dans la production laitière ː agriculture, élevage, santé animale, augmentation de la production et sécurité sanitaire du lait par la prévention de toute dégradation ainsi que de la tuberculose bovine. Produit par l'industrie laitière, ce film apprend aux consommateurs d'où vient le lait et combien l'industrie laitière fait d'efforts pour leur garantir un lait propre à la consommation. Son objectif ici n'est pas de faire valoir la valeur nutritive du lait.<br />
 +
''The Milky Way'' fut produit en 1943. On estime que les Britanniques consommèrent en moyenne 141 litres de lait par personne en 1949 et qu'environ 5  % de la population totale tirait ses revenus de l'industrie laitière. À cette époque, il y eut un grand débat entre, d'un côté, un certain nombre d'opposants au traitement industriel du lait, comme Lady Eve Balfour, auteure d'un ouvrage majeur sur l'agriculture biologique et le mouvement bio intitulé ''The Living Soil'' (Faber & Faber, 1943 - huitième édition publiée en 1948) et grande pourfendeuse de la pasteurisation. De l'autre côté, le corps médical ? que la pasteurisation augmenta dans les années 1940, tels le ''Medical Research Council'' et Sir Graham Selby Wilson, bactériologiste à la ''London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine'' et auteur d'un autre ouvrage-clé, ''The Pasteurisation of Milk'' (Arnold, 1942). Selby développa le test dit "de la phosphatase" et fit la promotion des mérites de la pasteurisation. On notera que le film comprend une animation qui explique la technique de pasteurisation ultra rapide à haute température introduite en Grande-Bretagne dans les années 1940, cette méthode étant plus efficace que celles qui étaient utilisées dans les années 1920 et 1930. <br />
 +
La pasteurisation fit l'objet d'un débat entre 1900 à 1945. Les activistes anti-pasteurisation, qui se méfiaient de la technologie moderne, étaient résolument opposés à la pasteurisation, à l'utilisation d'engrais et de produits chimiques ainsi qu'à la mécanisation de l'activité agricole qui, selon eux, diminueraient la fertilité du sol. Quant au monde médical, il voyait dans la pasteurisation un moyen de combattre la tuberculose non-pulmonaire (en mettant un terme à la transmission de la tuberculose bovine). Pour l'industrie laitière, la pasteurisation représentait un moyen d'augmenter la durée de conservation du lait.<br />
 +
En 1942, le ministère de l'Agriculture mit en place le ''National Milk Testing and Advisory Scheme'' (plan national de test et conseil sur le lait). Après 1945, la pasteurisation devint de plus en plus courante. (Elle fut rendue obligatoire en Écosse en 1983, mais jamais en Angleterre, ni au Pays de Galles.)<br />
 +
Le film prend clairement position en faveur de la pasteurisation. Mme Harris représente la population britannique qui se méfie de la technologie moderne et considère que les aliments transformés et artificiels sont dangereux. Le film démontre que ce point de vue repose sur nombre de croyances erronées et Mme Harris, comme le spectateur, finit par ouvrir les yeux sur ses erreurs. Le film oppose les (bonnes) pratiques modernes aux (mauvaises) pratiques traditionnelles. Cependant, il ne prend pas en compte les arguments d'une alimentation naturelle et bio qui demeure un mouvement important en Grande-Bretagne.<br />
 +
''United Dairies'', entreprise née de la fusion de quelques laiteries de moindre importance en 1915 et basée dans le Wiltshire, devint l'une des plus grandes laiteries du Royaume-Uni dans les années 50. L'entreprise s'engagea dans la vente de lait pasteurisé dès les années 1920. Cette société eut également beaucoup recours aux "trains laitiers" (comme son concurrent, ''Express Milk'') pour acheminer le lait jusqu'à Londres.
 
}}
 
}}
 
|Direction regard spectateur={{HT_Dirige
 
|Direction regard spectateur={{HT_Dirige
Line 56: Line 72:
 
|Texte=The film takes the spectator to the pastures and dairy farms, to the milking rooms, along the roads and rails to the depots and bottling plants. By following the “way” of the milk from the cow to the doorstep, each step of milk processing is explained, with particular emphasis on testing schemes and pasteurisation. Not only does the film “convert” the doubtful spectator, but also illustrates what large dairies, like United Dairies, do.
 
|Texte=The film takes the spectator to the pastures and dairy farms, to the milking rooms, along the roads and rails to the depots and bottling plants. By following the “way” of the milk from the cow to the doorstep, each step of milk processing is explained, with particular emphasis on testing schemes and pasteurisation. Not only does the film “convert” the doubtful spectator, but also illustrates what large dairies, like United Dairies, do.
  
The film is framed by the milk delivery service. The film opens with the milkman arriving at Mrs Harris doorstep, her scepticism of scientific and hygienic processing of milk opens the theme of the film. And between each informational scene or clip, the camera returns to Mrs Harris and her scepticism.  
+
The film is framed by the milk delivery service. The film opens with the milkman arriving at Mrs Harris doorstep, her scepticism of scientific and hygienic processing of milk opens the theme of the film. And between each informational scene or clip, the camera returns to Mrs Harris and her scepticism. <br /
 
There are three voices that narrate the film. One takes the spectator through the production of milk and the other details more scientific processes, and the third is that of the milk man who opens the film and near the end of the film explains the consumer’s role.
 
There are three voices that narrate the film. One takes the spectator through the production of milk and the other details more scientific processes, and the third is that of the milk man who opens the film and near the end of the film explains the consumer’s role.
 +
}}{{HT_Dirige
 +
|Langue=fr
 +
|Texte=Le film emmène le spectateur dans les pâturages et les fermes laitières, dans les salles de traite, sur les routes et les rails qui mènent aux dépôts et aux usines d'embouteillage. En suivant la "voie lactée", de la vache jusqu'au pas de la porte du consommateur, chaque étape du traitement du lait est expliqué, avec une insistance particulière sur les programmes de tests et la pasteurisation. Le film ne se contente pas "convertir" le spectateur dubitatif, il illustre également le fonctionnement de grandes laiteries comme ''United Dairies''.<br />
 +
C'est la livraison du lait qui sert de fil rouge au film. Il s'ouvre sur le laitier qui arrive devant chez Mme Harris. Le scepticisme de cette dernière en ce qui concerne le traitement scientifique et hygiénique du lait ouvre la thématique du film. Après chaque scène informationnelle, la caméra revient sur Mme Harris et son scepticisme. Les interlocuteurs de Mme Harris n'entrent pas du tout dans son jeu et ne font pas écho à ses propos véhéments. Ainsi, sa voisine ne réagit absolument pas à ses remarques. Quant à son mari, il reste dissimulé derrière son journal pendant tout le plan ǃ Cette absence de réaction renforce le message que veut faire passer le film sur le fait qu'un certain nombre de conceptions concernant le lait sont erronées.  <br />
 +
Le commentaire est dit par trois voix différentes. L'une explique au spectateur la production du lait, la deuxième détaille les processus plus scientifiques tandis que la troisième est celle du laitier sur qui le film s'ouvre. Vers la fin du film, c'est lui qui explique le rôle du consommateur.
 
}}
 
}}
 
|Présentation médecine={{HT_Prés
 
|Présentation médecine={{HT_Prés
 
|Langue=en
 
|Langue=en
 
|Texte=Health and medicine are present in the film as the motivation or argument for the processing of milk. That is, through processing, milk is pasteurised and repeatedly tested to make it safe for consumers and herein reduce infant mortality. The film does not discuss nutrition. There are multiple scenes of bacteriology laboratories, which figure as pivotal places in the milk production.
 
|Texte=Health and medicine are present in the film as the motivation or argument for the processing of milk. That is, through processing, milk is pasteurised and repeatedly tested to make it safe for consumers and herein reduce infant mortality. The film does not discuss nutrition. There are multiple scenes of bacteriology laboratories, which figure as pivotal places in the milk production.
 +
}}{{HT_Prés
 +
|Langue=fr
 +
|Texte=Dans ce film, la santé et la médecine sont les éléments qui motivent ou justifient le traitement du lait. En effet, la pasteurisation du lait et les tests répétés qu'il subit en font un aliment sans danger, ce qui contribue à réduire la mortalité infantile. Il n'est absolument pas question de nutrition. Nombreuses sont les scènes tournées dans des laboratoires de bactériologie dont le rôle dans la production du lait est fondamental.
 
}}
 
}}
 
|Lieu projection={{HT_Proj
 
|Lieu projection={{HT_Proj
 +
|Langue=en
 +
|Texte=No information. However, in the film, the milkman gives a brochure advertising the free screening of a film to Mrs Harris. It can herein be deduced that this film was likely made available for free screenings, perhaps by women’s groups or community centres or schools, as were many sponsored films.
 +
}}{{HT_Proj
 
|Langue=fr
 
|Langue=fr
 +
|Texte=Aucune information disponible. Cependant, dans le film, le laitier donne à Mme Harris une brochure d'informations concernant la projection gratuite d'un film. On peut en déduire que ce film a  probablement fait l'objet de projections gratuites, peut-être organisées par des groupes de femmes, des foyers municipaux ou des écoles, comme ce fut le cas de nombreux films de commande.
 
}}
 
}}
 
|Communications et événements associés au film={{HT_Com
 
|Communications et événements associés au film={{HT_Com
Line 70: Line 98:
 
}}
 
}}
 
|Public={{HT_Pub
 
|Public={{HT_Pub
|Langue=fr
+
|Langue=en
 
}}
 
}}
 
|Descriptif libre={{HT_Desc
 
|Descriptif libre={{HT_Desc
 +
|Langue=en
 +
|Texte='''The milkman and the battleaxe''' (00:00-01:30 )<br />
 +
The scene opens with the milkman delivering glass bottles of milk with a three-wheel Brush Pony electric milk float (1947 three-wheel vehicle) to the doorsteps of terraced houses on a residential street in urban Britain. The voiceover promptly begins speaking of hygiene, “The milky way flows from the breeding of fine cattle through the hygienic and scientific treatment of the milk to the daily delivery by the milk roundsman.” The camera zooms in on the milkman as he notes on the delivery he has just made, but he is interrupted by Mrs Harris, the next customer, impatient for her delivery. He proudly presents her with “One pint of full cream milk fully tested for butterfat and adulteration, pasteurised to kill all dangerous bacteria and delivered to your doorstep in an airtight sterilised bottle.” (This sentence captures what the United Dairies is selling, although the name of the dairy is not overtly visible in the film yet.) She expresses disdain at machines and recalls when she was young they just had “honest to goodness milk.”
 +
 +
'''“To ensure that healthy state of affairs”''' (01:30-03:50) <br />
 +
As the milkman returns to his vehicle and drives off, the narrator proposes to show just how much is done to ensure that milk is “a clean wholesome product.” The scene shifts away from the residential street, to milk itself. It is poured from the milk churn into a tank and then from a bottle into a glass, the black and white film focuses on the clean white image of milk (as a side note, many films have revelled in this, perhaps most famously the creamer scene in Sergei Eisenstein’s The General Line, 1929, Russia) as the narrator gives statistics on milk consumption in Britain (3 to 4 million gallons per day). As we see children sipping milk from small bottles in front of a brick building, presumably a school, in a scene common to films on milk but also on social welfare (i.e., Enough to Eat, 1936), the voiceover declares (or reminds) that it is “one of the richest and most nourishing of all our daily foods.” In contrast to the smiling children, the narrator underlines the danger that milk can present. The scene shifts to a laboratory, where two lab workers – a man and a woman – manipulate test tubes and pipettes. We hear how pasteurisation solves the dilemma of destroying harmful bacteria without destroying food value. The effect of this is then demonstrated in an animated graph representation of infant mortality rates between 1911 and 1941, with the decrease attributed to improved housing, sanitation, post-natal care and food hygiene. Here, the benefits of drinking milk and of pasteurizing it are argued. It is underlined that the 1911 infantile diarrhoea outbreak causing 203/1000 deaths can be blamed on raw cow’s milk and that with the school milk programmes during the war children gained half an inch (1.27cm) in height and 2 pounds (1kg) in weight.
 +
 +
'''The farmer and the veterinarian''' (03:50-06:40)<br />
 +
A line of glistening milk bottles glides across the screen, presumably in a bottling plant. The provision of safe pure milk requires “intricate and highly skilled organisation,” states the voiceover. This marks the next part of film, which will detail the involvement of farmers, scientists and dairymen. (That United Dairies is able to orchestrate such organisation is herein implied, as well as the idea that the farmers, scientists and dairymen are only as efficient as the body that coordinates them.) A close-up of a man gazing into the distance, a farmer, then huddled over a milk can. A zoom in on the label on the can allows us to read “Accredited Milk”. In the background, we see farm workers and tractors in the farmyard and cows in the pasture beyond the gate. The narrator emphasises the necessity of healthy cows and hygienic milking conditions, without which pasteurisation “would be useless”. This statement speaks directly to the argument against pasteurisation, of that time, that by pasteurising milk poor or dirty milk could be made fit for sale.
 +
The scene shifts between cows in a rather muddy plot to others in a grassy field, just as he states the words “hygienic conditions.” To detail the farmer’s job, there is a change in narrator. The farmer, standing at the gate speaking to another man, we are told can get expert advice from the Ministry of Agriculture and the County Committee, as well as advisors appointed to the dairies that he delivers his milk to. The scene shifts to another farmer standing next to a couple of bulls, also talking with someone. The narrator goes on to the important tasks of raising a good herd, the camera pans pastoral scenes of British farmland and cow herds. Then the cows are shown inside a low-ceilinged barn and in a cement-floored courtyard. The veterinarian also plays an important role, we are told, notably with regard to tuberculosis, contagious abortion and mastitis.
 +
 +
'''The cows: the breed and the feed''' (06:40-08:22) <br />
 +
The film then goes on to cow breeds and food. The narrator underlines that the food cows are given is particularly important in producing milk. We are struck by the deadpan narration, as a joke is attempted, “The cow has always said: Go west, young woman, go west” as a map of Britain is used to illustrate the Western counties where pastures are richer and milk yields are higher. The different breeds, including Guernsey, Jersey, Shorthorns, Friesians and Ayrshire, are all shown, although without close-up shots or colour, they are not clearly distinguishable from one another.  The cow’s diet is largely grass. A farmer fills a bucket and pours feed into the trough in the barn, with what the narrator explains might be hay, turnip, mangles, kale, oats and other foods, in proportion to how much milk they are producing.
 +
 +
'''“Good honest dirt”''' (08:23-09:15) <br />
 +
Like an ironic interlude from the dry, yet informative, narration, Mrs Harris narrates the view of an unkempt, hay-strewn barn where a farmer in a particularly dirty apron milks some manure-caked cows. She expresses her scepticism to her neighbour over the hedge separating their gardens, re-telling her conversation with the milkman and asking, “what’s wrong with good honest dirt, I want to know.”
 +
 +
'''The milk''' (09:15-14:00)<br />
 +
This interlude sets the scene for the main narrator to emphasize the four rules of modern safe milking “clean cows, sterile utensils, clean hands, and immediate cooling.” As it is shown how these can be obtained in the barn set-up and the methods to clean the cow and the herdsmen, the camera frames the task being performed. The milking process is similarly explained, with the clean overall of the herdsman glowing white against the darker tones of the hay and the cows. The camera zooms in on the strip cup as the foremilk is examined for signs of mastitis. And zooms in on a paper hanging on the wall as the herdsman fills in a chart, Minnie produced 27 ½ lbs of milk on May 9, 1948. The screen focuses on the details that the viewer is meant to retain.<br />
 +
The scene shifts to outside the farm gates. Milk churns are aligned on a raised wood platform. The platform, we see, is the exact height of the lorry bed and this facilitates the loading of the full churns and the unloading of the clean empty churns. Once again, the camera zooms in on the Accredited Milk label – the label that attests the milk was obtained from “healthy cows under the best hygienic conditions.” The farmer has done his job; he has produced the milk in the proper sanitary conditions. Now it is up to the dairymen to do his job, “safely and quickly.” Short scenes of lorries with flat beds aligned with milk churns driving through rural landscapes takes the milk, and the viewer, to the county dairy depot.
 +
 +
'''The county depot''' (14:15-20:05)<br />
 +
The county dairy is described as, primordially, the point where the first round of testing of the milk takes place. The milk churns are unloaded and smelled by experienced workers, the first test. These workers, like the modern herdsman in the milking parlour and laboratory workers, wear white uniforms. Three paths through the depot are then traced. That of the milk that is considered good, that which is doubtful and that of the emptied churns.<br />
 +
The milk that passes this test is poured into a tank and makes a quick journey through the depot – the rapidity of the process is stressed as time and temperature are of the essence. Milk is pumped through a cooler to near freezing and then to glass-lined (the glass acting as an insulator) or stainless steel 3000 gallon railroad tanks, which will transport the milk to the urban processing depots. United Dairies notably used the railroad to transport milk. <br />
 +
The milk that does not pass the test is sent to the county depot laboratory where further tests are performed: Resazurin test to see if it will keep, Phenolphthalein to measure the acidity to determine if it is beginning to sour, and the routine Gerber test to measure butterfat content.<br />
 +
The narrator changes and we now follow the empty churns. They are washed and sterilized. The laboratory workers – the same women that we saw in the laboratory – periodically leave the laboratory bench to test and monitor the inside of random churns to verify sterilisation. The tubing throughout the depot is also fully sterilised regularly.
 +
 +
'''"Pasteurisation"''' (20:05-21:00)<br />
 +
Another interlude featuring Mrs Harris introduces the next segment. Standing outside with a milk bottle in her hand, she expresses her doubts of the need for pasteurisation, speaking to someone sitting behind a newspaper, assumingly her husband.<br />
 +
This is followed by an explanation of pasteurisation and of Louis Pasteur’s “discovery” and work in the 1870s on microorganisms, yeasts and bacteria that cause milk to sour. A bearded man in a white lab coat works in a laboratory; this may have been intended as an allusion to Pasteur.
 +
 +
'''The town processing depot''' (21:00-27:43)<br />
 +
In a wide shot, we see the milk tanker as it arrives at the loading docks of the processing depot. This is where pasteurisation will take place. The milk is handled with “industrial organisation”. The term “industrial” here might be intended to draw a line between the agrarian pastoral origin of the milk and the modern industrial processing of the milk, and although they are contrasted, they are complementary. The milk is tested and pumped into 3000 gallon storage tanks; any milk that fails the laboratory tests is returned to the county depot. As the narrator describes the methods of pasteurisation commonly used, the camera tracks the tanks and multiple pipes and tubing in the processing plant. The first method, High Temperature Short Time (HTST) involves milk being heated to a high temperature (162° Fahrenheit) for a short time (15 seconds) and is explained with an animated diagram of the heater, holder and cooler. The image shifts between the animated diagram and footage of the real set up. The milk is then pumped directly into the bottling plant.  The second method, the Holder system, is described more succinctly as the milk being heated (to 145° Fahrenheit) and held at that temperature for 30 minutes. In both cases, milk is tested to monitor that pasteurisation has been efficiently carried out. <br />
 +
The narrator changes. A close-up shot of a few milk bottles, with black rubber stoppers and labelled “Sample” with a reference number, takes us into the laboratory. The camera zooms out and a woman in a white lab coat reaches for one of the bottles, shakes it and takes a sample with a pipette. As we watch her work, the narrator explains that phosphatase is destroyed by the pasteurisation process, after being treated with chemicals, the milk turns blue and the shade is matched to coloured disks that correspond to how much phosphatase remains. The lab worker finishes the test and writes something in a lab book. The black and white image cannot illustrate the blue hues, and it is a profile view of the lab worker as she looks through the comparator that demonstrates the comparison. This test - devised in 1934 in Great Britain and adopted officially in 1946 - is the only test that is fully explained in the film. <br />
 +
The voiceover shifts back to the earlier narrator as the scene leaves the laboratory and returns to the processing plant where a man in a white lab coat is hand-scrubbing the pasteurisation equipment (the plates of the regenerator). We are told how pasteurisation is the “only means of killing all pathogenic organisms and making milk safe.” The sterilisation of the equipment is shown and explained. That is, it isn’t sufficient to sterilise the milk, but every surface that the milk comes in contact with.
 +
 +
'''The central laboratory''' (27:43-28:32)<br />
 +
A shot of the exterior of a building shows we’ve left the processing depot and will now visit the United Dairies Central Laboratory. This laboratory oversees the laboratory work at each of the depots. We see lab workers, all female and dressed in white, working with test tubes and Bunsen burners with petri dishes spread out before them. The laboratory also houses a centre for research and a (lovely wood panelled) library to advise scientists, dairy men and farmers. Milk is also tested here for adulteration by measuring the freezing point.
 +
 +
'''St Mary’s Hospital''' (28:32-29:04)<br />
 +
The front steps and door of St Mary’s Hospital is framed on the screen as a man enters carrying a crate of milk bottles. Again, we see a woman working in a laboratory, here, where milk is further tested regularly for a tubercle test. The narrator explains, somewhat proudly, that in 12 years not a single sample has tested positive – a tribute to pasteurisation. Local authorities also take samples for testing. Here a man fills out paperwork, which the camera zooms in on to reveal is a certificate for phosphatase tests in the Metropolitan Borough of Hammersmith. These tests, we are told, are independent checks on the working of the dairy.
 +
 +
'''The bottling plant''' (29:05-30:56)<br />
 +
A view from above the automated bottling machinery, like small carousels of milk bottles going around and around as they are filled. Here there is music in the background, gradually increasing in volume. They, we are told and shown, handle all bottle sizes, from 1/3 pint for schools to 1 quart. Like a parade, the bottles sealed with an aluminium cover march by and we clearly hear the symphony that accompanies them, the hands of the workers only used to take them from the line to the crate. Conveyer belts take them to the loading dock, where they are loaded into insulated lorries to be delivered to distribution depots. Again, as we followed the milk tankers to the depot, we see the trucks driving down the motorway in the dark, to arrive just before the roundsmen set out on their house deliveries. The delivery vans vary from horse drawn to electric trucks. Notably, we see the roundsman that will deliver to Mrs Harris ready to go. The milk is delivered, but the empty bottles are also collected. The symphonic music begins in the bottling plant and ends as the milk man
 +
 +
'''The bottles''' (30:56-34:32)<br />
 +
Once we see this milk man sitting in his electric delivery van, his voice takes over the narration. “Bottles” he states pointedly, as we see a hand set two clean empty bottles on a doorstep. This is the role of the consumer in delivering safe milk. (We are shown a sign over the door, but it is illegible, perhaps reading “The Gables”.) From the doorstep, we enter the kitchen as the scene shifts to the opening of the refrigerator door. A hand places a bottle of milk in the refrigerator. The milk man indicates that this housewife is “sensible” keeping milk in the refrigerator or a “homemade refrigerator” by keeping the milk bottle wrapped in a wet flannel in a large bowl of cold water, herein demonstrating the technique for those who might not have a refrigerator. Another doorstep appears on the screen, with two empty dirty bottles. Again, we are shown a sign, this one reads “Mon Repos”. These bottles “tell” the story of an “aimless” housewife, who means well, but doesn’t use her “common sense” and we watch her bewilderedly put the milk bottle haphazardly on the top of the kitchen stove. Unrinsed bottles are stained and dirty, a breeding ground for dangerous germs, he stresses as again we see a hand placing dirty bottles on the doorstep. Rhetorically, yet deliberately, the narrator asks “Who would return bottles in this state?” The camera turns upwards and we see, not the “aimless” housewife of the previous scene, but Mrs Harris, gleaming down at the camera, and the milk man, who picks up the bottles. We watch his cheerful face, in a close-up shot, as he explains that back at the depot they’ll be put aside to be specially washed and sterilized and tested for bacteria. He gives her a flyer from between the pages of his delivery book, for a film show called “The Milky Way” to tell her all about his job, the farmers and the chemists. Her irascibility continues as she replies “Who’d ‘ave thought I’d have to go to the pictures to see what cows on the farm look like. Still it is something for nothing.” The milk man, emphatically, explains that unfortunately Mrs Harris is not the only one. We then see a number of with filthy, dirty, opaque bottles, and bottles containing straws on doorsteps; against a black backdrop a hand shows a bottle with a chestnut in it; a tool shed with a milk bottle filled with paint; a dainty table with a milk bottle vase. These bottles are out of the circuit. The milk man is back at the depot and puts Mrs Harris’ two dirty bottles in a wire crate off to one side of the loading dock. <br />
 +
The earlier narrator then takes us through the depot again, this time following the path of the clean empties as they are loaded by hand onto an automated machine. They emerge clean and sparkling and go into the filling room. The image of the parade of sparkling bottles moving away from the camera fades into an image of a parade of white milk bottles moving toward the camera.
 +
 +
'''“The milky way flows on.”''' (34:33-35:28)<br />
 +
The film comes to a close as the narrator takes us through short scenes to revisit the “milky way” – from the healthy herd, to the milk churns to the lorry to the county depot and to town, through the tubes of the pasteurising machine, the laboratory tests, the bottling rooms to the distributing depots and the delivery round into the awaiting hands of a smiling Mrs Harris who has proudly set out two clean bottles on her doorstep. Effectively, it is as if the camera fast-forwarded through to the next day, and we meet a new, informed Mrs Harris. That is, the film worked, Mrs Harris went to the film show, was enlightened and changes her ways.
 +
}}{{HT_Desc
 
|Langue=fr
 
|Langue=fr
 +
|Texte='''Le laitier et la mégère''' (00:00-01:30 )<br />
 +
La scène s'ouvre sur un laitier qui livre des bouteilles de lait en verre avec un triporteur à lait électrique Pink (véhicule à trois roues de 1947) sur le seuil de maisons en bandes dans un quartier résidentiel britannique. La voix off commence aussitôt à parler d'hygiène : « la voie lactée prend sa source dans l’élevage d’un bétail de qualité. Elle passe par un traitement hygiénique et scientifique du lait jusqu'à la livraison quotidienne par le laitier. » (''The milky way flows from the breeding of fine cattle through the hygienic and scientific treatment of the milk to the daily delivery by the milk roundsman.'' ) La caméra effectue un zoom avant sur le laitier au moment où il inscrit la livraison qu'il vient de faire, mais il est interrompu par Mme Harris, la cliente suivante, qui attend son lait avec impatience. Il lui donne fièrement « une pinte de lait entier, dont le taux de matière grasse et la pureté ont été testés, pasteurisé pour tuer toutes les bactéries dangereuses et livré à votre porte dans une bouteille stérilisée hermétique ». (''One pint of full cream milk fully tested for butterfat and adulteration, pasteurised to kill all dangerous bacteria and delivered to your doorstep in an airtight sterilised bottle.'') (Cette phrase résume le message des ''United Dairies'', bien que le nom de la laiterie ne soit pas encore visible dans le film.) Mme Harris exprime son mépris des machines et se rappelle que, quand dans sa jeunesse, ils avaient juste « du lait sans chichi » (''honest to goodness milk'').<br />
 +
<br />
 +
'''« Pour garantir cette salubrité »''' (01:30-03:50)<br />
 +
Tandis que le laitier retourne dans son véhicule et s'en va, le narrateur propose de montrer au spectateur tout ce qui est fait pour s’assurer que le lait soit « un produit hygiénique et sain ». La caméra quitte le quartier résidentiel de Mme Harris pour se braquer sur le lait lui-même. Il est versé d’un bidon dans un réservoir puis d'une bouteille dans un verre. Le film noir et blanc se centre sur la blancheur du lait (accessoirement, de nombreux films ont pris un grand plaisir à faire de même, la scène la plus célèbre de ce type étant probablement la scène du crémier dans ''La Ligne générale'' de Sergei Eisenstein, 1929, Russie). En même temps, le narrateur donne des statistiques sur la consommation de lait en Grande-Bretagne (13 à 16 millions de litres par jour). Dans une scène commune aux films sur le lait mais aussi sur l’aide sociale (exemple : ''Enough to Eat'', 1936), des enfants sirotent du lait dans de petites bouteilles devant un bâtiment en brique qui est probablement une école. En même temps, la voix off affirme (ou nous rappelle) que le lait est « l’un de nos aliments quotidiens les plus riches et les plus nourrissants » (''one of the richest and most nourishing of all our daily foods.''). Elle souligne ensuite les dangers que le lait peut représenter, ce qui contraste avec le sourire des enfants.<br />
 +
Nouvelle scène : dans un laboratoire, deux laborantins – un homme et une femme – manipulent des tubes à essai et des pipettes. La voix off explique comment la pasteurisation permet de résoudre un dilemme : tuer les bactéries nocives sans détruire la valeur nutritionnelle du lait. Les effets de cette méthode sont mis en évidence par un graphique animé montrant les taux de mortalité infantile entre 1911 et 1941. La diminution de ce taux est attribuée à l'amélioration des conditions de logement et des installations sanitaires, aux soins donnés aux nourrissons et à l'hygiène alimentaire. Les bénéfices qu'il y a à boire du lait et à le pasteuriser sont discutés. La voix off insiste sur le fait d'une part, que l'épidémie de diarrhée infantile qui causa 20,3 % de décès en 1911 fut causée par du lait de vache cru et d'autre part que, pendant la guerre, les enfants ont grandi en moyenne de 1,27 cm et pris 1 kg grâce aux programmes de distribution de lait dans les écoles.<br />
 +
<br />
 +
'''Le fermier et le vétérinaire''' (03:50-06:40)<br />
 +
Une ligne de bouteilles de lait scintille en passant devant nos yeux, vraisemblablement dans une usine d'embouteillage. Pour fournir du lait pur et sans danger, une "organisation complexe et hautement qualifiée" (''intricate and highly skilled'') est nécessaire, affirme la voix off. C'est le début d'une nouvelle séquence du film qui détaille le rôle des fermiers, des scientifiques et des laitiers. (Le film sous-entend ici que ''United Dairies'' est capable de mettre en œuvre toute cette organisation, et que l'efficacité des fermiers, des scientifiques et des laitiers dépend de celle de l'organisme qui les coordonne.) Gros plan sur un homme, un fermier, en train de regarder au loin puis que l'on retrouve penché sur un bidon de lait. Un zoom avant sur l'étiquette du bidon nous permet de lire les mots ''Accredited Milk''  ("Lait agréé"). En arrière-plan, on voit des fermiers et des tracteurs dans la cour de la ferme, ainsi que des vaches au pré, de l'autre côté de la barrière. Le narrateur insiste sur la nécessité que les vaches soient en bonne santé et traites dans de bonnes conditions d'hygiène sans lesquelles la pasteurisation serait "vaine" (''useless''). Cette affirmation répond directement à l'argument des adversaires de la pasteurisation de l'époque selon lequel la pasteurisation pourrait permettre de vendre un lait de mauvaise qualité ou impur.<br />
 +
La caméra passe de vaches sur un terrain assez boueux à un pré herbeux au moment où les mots ''hygienic conditions'' ("conditions d'hygiène") sont prononcés. Changement de narrateur au moment d'expliciter le travail du fermier. Ce dernier, que l'on voit debout à la barrière en train de discuter avec un autre homme, peut bénéficier de conseils d'experts du ministère de l'Agriculture, du ''County Committee'' (comité du comté) ainsi que de la part de conseillers rattachés aux laiteries auxquelles il livre son lait. La caméra passe à un deuxième homme debout à côté de quelques taureaux et également en train de discuter avec un autre homme. Le narrateur évoque l'importance d'élever un bon troupeau tandis que la caméra fait un panoramique sur des scènes pastorales britanniques et des troupeaux de vaches. Plan sur des vaches dans une étable à plafond bas et dans une cour dont le sol est en ciment. Le vétérinaire est mentionné,  il joue également un rôle important, notamment en ce qui concerne la tuberculose, les avortements contagieux et la mammite. <br />
 +
<br />
 +
'''Les vaches ː races et alimentation''' (06:40-08:22) <br />
 +
Le film passe ensuite aux races de bétail et à leur alimentation. Le narrateur souligne le rôle que joue l'alimentation des vaches dans la production de lait. Le spectateur est frappé par le ton pince-sans-rire du narrateur qui tente une plaisanterie ː "La vache a toujours dit ː Va vers l'Ouest, jeune femme, va vers l'Ouest ǃ". Une carte de la Grande-Bretagne apparaît au même moment. Elle sert à montrer les comtés de l'ouest où les pâturages sont plus riches et les quantités de lait produites plus importantes. Les différentes races (guernesey, jersiaise, shorthorn, frisonne et airshire) sont toutes montrées, même si en l'absence de gros plan ou de couleur, il est difficile de les distinguer les unes des autres. La vache se nourrit en grande partie d'herbe. Un fermier remplit un seau et remplit l'auge de l'étable. Le narrateur explique qu'il peut s'agir de foin, de navets, de betteraves fourragères, de choux frisés, d'avoine et d'autres aliments, en fonction des quantités de lait produites par les vaches.<br />
 +
<br />
 +
'''"Un peu de saleté n'a jamais fait de mal à personne, voyons ǃ"'''(08:23-09:15) <br />
 +
Comme un interlude ironique dans un commentaire informatif un peu aride, Mme Harris raconte ses souvenirs d'enfance à la ferme. Ses propos sont renforcés par une séquence tournée dans une grange mal entretenue et jonchée de paille où un fermier portant un tablier particulièrement sale trait des vaches maculées de fumier séché. Elle exprime son scepticisme à sa voisine par dessus la haie qui sépare leurs jardins en lui racontant sa conversation avec le laitier et en s'exclamant ː "Un peu de saleté n'a jamais fait de mal à personne, voyons ǃ"<br />
 +
<br />
 +
'''Le lait''' (09:15-14:00)<br />
 +
Cet interlude a préparé le terrain pour que le narrateur principal puisse souligner les quatre règles de base de la traite moderne ː "des vaches propres, des ustensiles stériles, des mains propres et un refroidissement immédiat." La caméra se focalise sur chacun de ces aspects, sur la façon de les mettre en œuvre dans l'étable et sur les méthodes de nettoyage des vaches et des vachers. Le processus de la traite est expliqué de même, tandis que la blouse propre du vacher éclate de blancheur sur le fond plus sombre que composent les vaches et le foin. Zoom sur la tasse-filtre au moment où les premiers jets de lait sont examinés pour vérifier qu'il n'y a pas de signe de mammite. Nouveau zoom sur un papier accroché au mur. Le vacher remplit un tableau ː Minnie a produit  27 ½ lbs (soit environ 12,5 L) de lait le 9 mai 1948. La caméra est toujours braquée sur les éléments que le spectateur est censé retenir. <br />
 +
Nouvelle scène, au-delà des barrières qui entourent la ferme. Des bidons de lait sont posés sur une plateforme en bois exactement à la même hauteur que le plateau du camion, ce qui facilite le chargement des bidons pleins ainsi que le déchargement des bidons propres et vides. Nouveau zoom sur l'étiquette ''Accredited Milk'' qui atteste que le lait a été produit par des "vaches en bonne santé et dans les meilleures conditions d'hygiène" (''healthy cows under the best hygienic conditions''). Le fermier a accompli sa tâche, il a produit le lait dans les conditions sanitaires adéquates. À présent, c'est au tour des laitiers de faire leur travail "en toute sécurité et rapidement" (''safely and quickly''). Courtes scènes montrant des camions à plate-forme transportant des bidons de lait alignés traversant des paysages ruraux pour amener le lait, et le spectateur, jusqu'au dépôt de lait du comté.<br />
 +
<br />
 +
'''Le dépôt du comté''' (14:15-20:05)<br />
 +
La laiterie du comté est décrite comme étant, avant tout, l'endroit où le lait est soumis à la première série de tests. Les bidons de lait sont déchargés. Premier test ː des employés expérimentés les sentent. Ces employés, comme les vachers modernes dans la salle de traite et les laborantins, portent des uniformes blancs. À partir de là, le spectateur suit trois trajectoires possibles ː celle du lait considéré comme bon, celle du lait douteux et celle des bidons qui ont été vidés.<br />
 +
Le lait qui a satisfait au premier test est versé dans une cuve et traverse rapidement le dépôt - le commentaire insiste sur cette rapidité et sur la température qui sont toutes deux des éléments essentiels. Le lait est pompé dans un refroidisseur et amené à une température avoisinant le point de congélation. Ensuite, il est transféré dans des wagons-citernes doublés de verre (qui sert d'isolant) ou en acier inoxydable, d'une capacité d'environ 13 600 L. Ces wagons le transporteront jusqu'aux grandes usines urbaines de traitement du lait. Il est intéressant de noter que ''United Dairies'' acheminait le lait par le train.<br />
 +
Le lait qui n'a pas satisfait au premier test est envoyé au laboratoire du dépôt du comté où il fait l'objet d'autres tests ː le test à la résazurine pour voir s'il se conservera, le test à la phénolphtaléine pour mesurer son taux d'acidité et déterminer s'il a commencé à tourner et le test de routine Gerber pour mesurer le taux de matière grasse du lait.<br />
 +
Le narrateur change et nous suivons à présent les bidons vides. Ils sont lavés et stérilisés. Les laborantines - il s'agit des mêmes femmes que celles que nous avons déjà vues dans le laboratoire - quittent périodiquement leur paillasse pour tester et contrôler de façon aléatoire l'intérieur des bidons afin de vérifier la stérilisation. L'ensemble des tuyaux qui traversent le dépôt est également stérilisé régulièrement.<br />
 +
<br />
 +
'''"La pasteurisation"''' (20:05-21:00)<br />
 +
Nouvel interlude en compagnie de Mme Harris. Debout à l'extérieur avec une bouteille de lait vide à la main, elle exprime ses doutes à propos de la nécessité de la pasteurisation en s'adressant à une personne assise (probablement son mari) et dissimulée par un journal.<br />
 +
Il s'ensuit une explication de la pasteurisation, de la "découverte" de Pasteur et de son travail, dans les années 1870, sur les micro-organismes, les levures et les bactéries qui font tourner le lait. Un homme barbu en blouse blanche travaille dans un laboratoire ; ce plan se veut peut-être une allusion à Pasteur.<br />
 +
<br />
 +
'''L'usine de traitement du lait de la ville'''(21:00-27:43)<br />
 +
Plan large montrant une citerne de lait qui arrive sur l'aire de chargement/déchargement de l'usine. C'est ici que la pasteurisation aura lieu. Le lait est traité selon une "organisation industrielle" (''industrial organisation''). Il est fort possible que le terme "industriel" soit employé ici pour détacher le traitement industriel moderne du lait de ses origines champêtres. Cependant, bien que ces deux phases soient mises en opposition, elles sont complémentaires. Le lait est testé et pompé dans une cuve de stockage de 13 620 L. Le lait qui ne satisfait pas aux analyses pratiquées en laboratoire est systématiquement retourné au dépôt du comté. La voix off décrit les méthodes de pasteurisation les plus courantes tandis que la caméra suit au fur et à mesure les cuves et multiples tuyaux de l'usine. La première méthode, la pasteurisation ultra rapide à haute température, nécessite de porter le lait à une température élevée (72° C) pendant un temps court (15 s) comme l'explique un schéma animé du pasteurisateur, du chambreur et du refroidisseur. Tout de suite après l'animation, l'image passe à l'installation réelle. Ensuite, le lait est acheminé directement vers l'usine d'embouteillage par pompage. Le second méthode, dite méthode de Holder, est décrite plus succinctement. Elle consiste à porter le lait à 63° C et à le maintenir à cette température pendant 30 min. Dans les deux cas, le lait est testé pour vérifier que la pasteurisation a bien fonctionné.<br />
 +
Changement de narrateur. Un gros plan sur quelques bouteilles de lait avec des bouchons en caoutchouc noir et une étiquette portant le mot ''Sample'' ("spécimen") et un numéro d'identification, fait entrer le spectateur dans le laboratoire. Zoom arrière. Une femme en blouse blanche saisit l'une des bouteilles, l'agite et prélève un échantillon de lait avec une pipette. Pendant que nous la regardons travailler, le narrateur explique que la phosphatase est détruite par la pasteurisation. Après traitement par des produits chimiques, le lait devient bleu. Sa teinte est comparée à des nuanciers pour déterminer combien il contient encore de phosphatase. La laborantine termine son test et inscrit quelque chose dans un registre. L'image en noir et blanc ne peut pas rendre compte des différentes nuances de bleu, c'est donc une vue de profil de la laborantine en train de regarder à travers le nuancier qui montre comment se fait la comparaison. Ce test conçu en 1934 en Grande-Bretagne et adopté officiellement en 1946 est le seul test qui soit expliqué en entier dans le film.<br />
 +
Reprise par le narrateur précédent. On quitte le laboratoire pour revenir à l'usine de traitement du lait où un homme en blouse blanche est en train de récurer le matériel de pasteurisation (plaques du récupérateur de chaleur). Le spectateur apprend que la pasteurisation est "le seul moyen de détruire les organismes pathogènes et d'assurer la sécurité sanitaire du lait" (''only means of killing all pathogenic organisms and making milk safe''). La stérilisation du matériel est montrée et expliquée pour signifier qu'il ne suffit de stériliser le lait, il faut également stériliser toutes les surfaces avec lesquelles le lait entre en contact.<br />
 +
<br />
 +
'''Le laboratoire central''' (27:43-28:32)<br />
 +
Un plan de l'extérieur d'un bâtiment montre que nous avons quitté l'usine de traitement du lait pour visiter le laboratoire central de ''United Dairies''. Ce laboratoire supervise toutes les analyses et tous les tests réalisés dans chacun des dépôts. Des laborantines (il n'y a pas d'homme) vêtues de blanc manipulent des tubes à essai et des becs Bunsen. Des boîtes de Petri sont disposées devant elles. Le laboratoire abrite également un centre de recherches et une bibliothèque (aux murs couverts de belles boiseries) pour conseiller les scientifiques, les employés des laiteries et les fermiers. On vérifie aussi que le lait n'a pas été coupé en mesurant son point de congélation.<br />
 +
<br />
 +
'''L'hôpital St Mary''' (28:32-29:04)<br />
 +
L'entrée de l'hôpital St Mary apparaît à l'écran. Un homme portant une caisse de bouteilles de lait y entre. Nouveau plan sur une laborantine au travail. Ici, le lait subit régulièrement un test supplémentaire, celui de la tuberculose. Le commentateur explique d'un ton assez fier qu'en 12 ans, aucun prélèvement n'a été testé positif, ce qui est une façon de reconnaitre les bienfaits de la pasteurisation. Les autorités locales prélèvent également des échantillons pour les analyser. À cet effet, un homme remplit des papiers. Un zoom avant permet au spectateur de constater qu'il s'agit d'un certificat de test de la phosphatase dans l'arrondissement de Hammersmith à Londres. Le narrateur explique que ces tests sont réalisés par des organismes indépendants pour contrôler le fonctionnement de la laiterie.<br />
 +
<br />
 +
'''L'usine d'embouteillage''' (29:05-30:56)<br />
 +
Vue plongeante sur la machine d'embouteillage automatique. Les bouteilles de lait tournent comme sur de petits manèges pendant leur remplissage. Ici, on remarque un fond musical dont le volume augmente. La voix off explique et le spectateur voit en même temps que toutes les tailles de bouteilles passent par cette chaine, des bouteilles d'un tiers de pinte (environ 20 cl) pour les écoles jusqu'aux bouteilles d'un peu plus d'un litre. Les bouteilles fermées par un opercule en aluminium défilent en bon ordre, comme à la parade. Le spectateur entend clairement la symphonie qui les accompagne. Les mains des ouvriers ne servent qu'à saisir les bouteilles sur la chaine et à les ranger dans des caisses que des tapis roulants amènent jusqu'à l'aire de chargement. Là, les caisses sont chargées dans des camions calorifugés qui vont les livrer aux dépôts de distribution. Encore une fois, de même que nous avons suivi les citernes de lait en route vers le dépôt, nous voyons les camions rouler sur l'autoroute, de nuit, et arriver juste avant le départ des laitiers qui vont livrer le lait de maison en maison. Les moyens de locomotion utilisés pour ces livraisons varient du véhicule tiré par un cheval aux camionnettes électriques. La caméra s'attarde plus particulièrement sur le laitier qui va livrer son lait à Mme Harris. Il est prêt à partir. Non seulement les laitiers livrent le lait mais ils récupèrent également les bouteilles vides. La musique symphonique qui a débuté dans l'usine d'embouteillage s'arrête au moment où le laitier démarre sa tournée.<br />
 +
<br />
 +
'''Les bouteilles''' (30:56-34:32)<br />
 +
Une fois le laitier installé dans son triporteur électrique, c'est sa voix qui poursuit la narration. "Les bouteilles", dit-il d'un ton plein de sous-entendus au moment où une main pose deux bouteilles propres sur le seuil d'une porte. C'est là que le consommateur a un rôle à jouer. (Un petit panneau quasiment illisible au-dessus de la porte  indique le nom de la maison. C'est peut-être ''The Gables'', c'est-à-dire "Les Pignons".) Après avoir passé le seuil de la porte, on entre directement dans la cuisine par l'intermédiaire d'un gros plan sur la porte du réfrigérateur qui s'ouvre. Une main y range une bouteille de lait. Le laitier signale que cette ménagère fait preuve de sens pratique en conservant le lait au réfrigérateur ou dans un réfrigérateur "artisanal", c'est-à-dire en plaçant la bouteille de lait enveloppée d'un torchon humide dans un saladier plein d'eau. Cette séquence sert de démonstration de la méthode aux spectateurs qui ne possèderaient pas de réfrigérateur chez eux.<br />
 +
Un autre pas-de-porte apparaît à l'écran, cette fois avec deux bouteilles vides et sales. Un autre panneau, cette fois-ci avec l'inscription "Mon repos". Ces bouteilles "racontent l'histoire" d'une ménagère brouillonne (''aimless'') qui a de bonnes intentions mais ne fait pas preuve de "bon sens" (''common sense''). Nous la voyons poser la bouteille de lait au-dessus de la cuisinière d'un air perplexe. La voix off poursuit en expliquant que les bouteilles qui ne sont pas rincées sont tachées et sales, et qu'elles constituent un milieu idéal pour le développement de dangereux microbes. En même temps, à l'écran, une main place deux bouteille sales sur un pas-de-porte. Le commentateur pose volontairement une question rhétorique ː "Qui se permettrait de rendre des bouteilles dans un état pareil ?" La caméra remonte pour révéler, non pas le visage de la ménagère brouillonne mais celui de Mme Harris qui jette un regard de défi à la caméra tandis que le laitier ramasse les bouteilles. Gros plan sur le visage enjoué de l'homme qui explique qu'au dépôt, ces bouteilles seront mises à part avant de subir un lavage spécial, une stérilisation et des analyses bactériologiques. Il prend dans son registre de livraison un prospectus qu'il tend à Mme Harris. Il s'agit de l'annonce de la projection d'un film intitulé ''The Milky Way'' qui parle de son travail, des fermiers et des chimistes. L’irascibilité de Mme Harris ne connait pas de borne car elle poursuit ː "Si on m'avait dit qu'il faudrait que j'aille au cinéma pour voir des vaches dans une ferme ǃ Enfin, du moment que c'est gratuit ǃ" (''Who’d ‘ave thought I’d have to go to the pictures to see what cows on the farm look like. Still it is something for nothing.'') Le laitier explique clairement que, malheureusement, Mme Harris n'est pas la seule à se comporter ainsi. Succession de plans montrant des bouteilles dégoutantes, sales et opaques ainsi que des bouteilles contenant des pailles posées sur des seuils de porte ; une main sur un fond noir montre une bouteille contenant une châtaigne ; une remise avec des outils et une bouteille contenant de la peinture ; une table dressée pour le thé avec une bouteille de lait servant de vase. Ces bouteilles ne sont plus dans le circuit. De retour au dépôt, le laitier place les deux bouteilles sales de Mme Harris dans une caisse métallique à part, d'un côté de l'aire de chargement.<br />
 +
Le narrateur précédent nous refait passer par le dépôt. Cette fois-ci, nous suivons les bouteilles vides propres qui sont placées à la main dans une machine automatique. Elles en ressortent propres et étincelantes puis passent au remplissage. Fondu enchainé ː le défilé des bouteilles étincelantes qui s'éloignent de la caméra laisse la place à un défilé de bouteilles de lait blanc qui progressent en direction de la caméra.<br />
 +
<br />
 +
'''“La voie lactée continue à couler”''' (34:33-35:28)<br />
 +
Pour terminer, le narrateur nous fait de nouveau emprunter la "voie lactée" à travers de courtes scènes ː du troupeau de vaches en bonne santé en passant par les bidons de lait, le camion, le dépôt du comté, les tuyaux du pasteurisateur, les tests en laboratoire, les salles d'embouteillage, les dépôts de distribution et les tournées de livraison jusqu'aux mains d'une Mme Harris souriante qui a déposé fièrement deux bouteilles propres devant sa porte. On dirait que la caméra a fait une avance rapide sur toute la journée du lendemain. La "nouvelle" Mme Harris, souriante et avertie, que nous voyions à présent est la preuve que le film a atteint son but. Mme Harris est allée le voir et les informations qu'elle en a retiré l'ont incitée à changer de comportement.
 
}}
 
}}
 
|Notes complémentaires={{HT_Notes
 
|Notes complémentaires={{HT_Notes
Line 79: Line 211:
 
}}
 
}}
 
|Références={{HT_Réf
 
|Références={{HT_Réf
 +
|Langue=en
 +
|Texte=Peter J. Atkins, 2000, “The pasteurization of England: The science, culture and health implications of milk processing, 1900-1950” in David F. Smith and Jim Philips, eds., ''Food, Science, Policy and Regulation in the Twentieth Century: International and Comparative Perspectives'' (Routledge: London and New York), 37-51.
 +
 +
H. D. Kay, 1950, “The National Institute for Research in Dairying, Shinfield, Reading.” ''Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series A, Mathematical and Physical Sciences'', 205(1083), 453-467. URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/98697
 +
 +
“United Dairies” ''Wikipedia.org'', URL: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Dairies (consulted 25 January 2021)
 +
}}{{HT_Réf
 
|Langue=fr
 
|Langue=fr
 +
|Texte=Peter J. Atkins, 2000, “The pasteurization of England: The science, culture and health implications of milk processing, 1900-1950” in David F. Smith and Jim Philips, eds., ''Food, Science, Policy and Regulation in the Twentieth Century: International and Comparative Perspectives'' (Routledge: London and New York), 37-51.
 +
 +
H. D. Kay, 1950, “The National Institute for Research in Dairying, Shinfield, Reading.” ''Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series A, Mathematical and Physical Sciences'', 205(1083), 453-467. URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/98697
 
}}
 
}}
 
|Documents_Film=
 
|Documents_Film=
 
|Documents_Externes=
 
|Documents_Externes=
 
}}
 
}}

Latest revision as of 15:29, 25 October 2021

 

The Milky Way UK

Title The Milky Way UK
Year of production 1948
Country of production Royaume-Uni
Director(s) Donald Rawlings
Duration 35 minutes
Format Parlant - Noir et blanc - 16 mm
Original language(s) English
Production companies Wallace Productions Limited
Commissioning body United Dairies Limited
Archive holder(s) Wellcome Collection

Main credits

THE MILKY WAY. Direction Donald Rawlings. Camera J. E. Ewins. Supervision A. V. Curtice. Sound Peter Birch, R. A. Smith. Produced for United Dairies Limited by Wallace Productions Limited.

(français)
THE MILKY WAY. Direction Donald Rawlings. Camera J. E. Ewins. Supervision A. V. Curtice. Sound Peter Birch, R. A. Smith. Produced for United Dairies Limited by Wallace Productions Limited.

Content

Theme

(français)

Main genre

Documentaire

Synopsis

FROM THE WELLCOME COLLECTION CATALOGUE "A comprehensive look at 'the milky way' - the process of milk delivery from cattle breeding to milk delivery on the doorstep. Having explained the need for pasteurisation, the film thoroughly illustrates the entire process: milking under hygienic conditions; delivery to country depots for testing; to processing depots for pasteurising; to central laboratory for final examination and bottling; to distribution depots; and, finally, delivery. The narration reminds viewers to rinse and return empty bottles (the film is sponsored by United Dairies) and then offers a glimpse of the washing process. Similarly viewers are reminded that, during World War II, pasteurised milk was vital to children's health. Stereotypes of British housewives in the 1940s appear throughout. This is offset with some good laboratory shots of female technicians testing milk quality."

(français)
D'APRÈS LE CATALOGUE DE LA WELLCOME COLLECTION ː "Une revue détaillée de la "voie lactée" - de l'élevage du bétail à la livraison du lait sur le pas de la porte des clients. Après avoir expliqué pourquoi la pasteurisation est nécessaire, le film décrit tout le processus de façon exhaustive ː la traite dans de bonnes conditions sanitaires ; la livraison dans les dépôts du comté où le lait est testé ; la pasteurisation dans d'autres dépôts ; les derniers tests dans un laboratoire central, et l'embouteillage ; les dépôts de distribution ; et enfin, la livraison. Le commentaire rappelle aux spectateurs la nécessité de retourner les bouteilles après les avoir rincées (le film est financé par United Dairies) et montre le nettoyage des bouteilles. De même, il rappelle que pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale, le lait pasteurisé a joué un rôle crucial pour la santé des enfants. Des stéréotypes sur les femmes au foyer britanniques des années 1940 apparaissent tout au long du film. Ils sont contrebalancés par un certain nombre de plans de bonne qualité sur des techniciennes de laboratoire en train de tester la qualité du lait.

Context

This film on milk does not treat the question of nutrition. Like many sponsored industrial films, this film takes us to rural landscapes and inside factories that we would might not otherwise have a chance to visit. The topics of the film reflect the concerns of those working in dairy research and dairy production: agriculture, animal husbandry, animal health, increased production, and making milk safe by preventing spoilage and transmission of bovine tuberculosis. As a film produced by the dairy industry, it educated consumers where milk came from and on the lengths taken by the dairy industry to ensure that milk was safe for consumption. Here the dairy industry does not attempt to sell milk for its nutritive value.

The Milky Way was produced in 1948. It was estimated that 31 gallons of liquid milk per head were consumed on average by every individual in Great Britian in 1949 and that approximately 5 % of the total population of the country was supported by the dairy industry. At this time, notable discourse came on one hand from many acting against processing of milk, such as Lady Eve Balfour, author of the seminal volume on organic farming and the organic movement, The Living Soil (Faber & Faber, 1943 - its eighth edition published in 1948) who was particularly critical of pasteurisation. On the other, the medical bodies that pasteurisation increased in the 1940s, such as the Medical Research Council and Sir Graham Selby Wilson, bacteriologist at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, author of the landmark volume The Pasteurisation of Milk (Arnold, 1942) who developed the phosphatase test and promoted the merits of pasteurisation. The film notably features an animation to explain the HTST (High temperature short time) pasteurisation method introduced to Britain in the 1940s, a more efficient method than those used in the 1920s and 1930s.
Pasteurization was debated in Britain from 1900 to 1945. Anti-pasteurisation activists were notably sceptical of modern technology adamantly opposed pasteurisation, as well as the use of fertilisers, chemicals and mechanised cultivation which would degrade soil fertility, while the medical sphere supported pasteurisation as a means to fight non-pulmonary tuberculosis (by ending the transmission of bovine tuberculosis) and the dairy industry saw pasteurisation as a means to extend the shelf-life of milk.
In 1942, the Ministry of Agriculture implemented the National Milk Testing and Advisory Scheme. And after 1945, pasteurisation became increasingly common. (It became compulsory in Scotland in 1983, but never in England or Wales.)
The film comes as a clear argument for pasteurisation with Mrs Harris representing the British population that was sceptical of modern technology and perceived a threat in unnatural or processed foods. The film demonstrates that this view to be rife with erroneous beliefs, and Mrs Harris is, like the spectator, enlightened by the film. The film argues modern (good) versus traditional (poor) practices. This however, does not directly address the ongoing argument for organic and natural food, which remained a strong movement in Britain.

United Dairies, formed upon the merging of a few smaller dairies in 1915, and based out of Wiltshire was one of the largest dairies in the United Kingdom by the 1950s; They acted for the sale of pasteurised milk from the 1920s. The company was also a large user of milk trains (like its competitor Express Milk) to transport milk to London.

(français)
Ce film ne parle pas de nutrition. Comme de nombreux films industriels de commande, il donne à voir des paysages ruraux et l'intérieur d'usines que nous n'aurions peut-être jamais la possibilité de visiter autrement. Les thèmes du film reflètent les préoccupations des personnes impliquées dans la recherche sur le lait et dans la production laitière ː agriculture, élevage, santé animale, augmentation de la production et sécurité sanitaire du lait par la prévention de toute dégradation ainsi que de la tuberculose bovine. Produit par l'industrie laitière, ce film apprend aux consommateurs d'où vient le lait et combien l'industrie laitière fait d'efforts pour leur garantir un lait propre à la consommation. Son objectif ici n'est pas de faire valoir la valeur nutritive du lait.

The Milky Way fut produit en 1943. On estime que les Britanniques consommèrent en moyenne 141 litres de lait par personne en 1949 et qu'environ 5  % de la population totale tirait ses revenus de l'industrie laitière. À cette époque, il y eut un grand débat entre, d'un côté, un certain nombre d'opposants au traitement industriel du lait, comme Lady Eve Balfour, auteure d'un ouvrage majeur sur l'agriculture biologique et le mouvement bio intitulé The Living Soil (Faber & Faber, 1943 - huitième édition publiée en 1948) et grande pourfendeuse de la pasteurisation. De l'autre côté, le corps médical ? que la pasteurisation augmenta dans les années 1940, tels le Medical Research Council et Sir Graham Selby Wilson, bactériologiste à la London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine et auteur d'un autre ouvrage-clé, The Pasteurisation of Milk (Arnold, 1942). Selby développa le test dit "de la phosphatase" et fit la promotion des mérites de la pasteurisation. On notera que le film comprend une animation qui explique la technique de pasteurisation ultra rapide à haute température introduite en Grande-Bretagne dans les années 1940, cette méthode étant plus efficace que celles qui étaient utilisées dans les années 1920 et 1930.
La pasteurisation fit l'objet d'un débat entre 1900 à 1945. Les activistes anti-pasteurisation, qui se méfiaient de la technologie moderne, étaient résolument opposés à la pasteurisation, à l'utilisation d'engrais et de produits chimiques ainsi qu'à la mécanisation de l'activité agricole qui, selon eux, diminueraient la fertilité du sol. Quant au monde médical, il voyait dans la pasteurisation un moyen de combattre la tuberculose non-pulmonaire (en mettant un terme à la transmission de la tuberculose bovine). Pour l'industrie laitière, la pasteurisation représentait un moyen d'augmenter la durée de conservation du lait.
En 1942, le ministère de l'Agriculture mit en place le National Milk Testing and Advisory Scheme (plan national de test et conseil sur le lait). Après 1945, la pasteurisation devint de plus en plus courante. (Elle fut rendue obligatoire en Écosse en 1983, mais jamais en Angleterre, ni au Pays de Galles.)
Le film prend clairement position en faveur de la pasteurisation. Mme Harris représente la population britannique qui se méfie de la technologie moderne et considère que les aliments transformés et artificiels sont dangereux. Le film démontre que ce point de vue repose sur nombre de croyances erronées et Mme Harris, comme le spectateur, finit par ouvrir les yeux sur ses erreurs. Le film oppose les (bonnes) pratiques modernes aux (mauvaises) pratiques traditionnelles. Cependant, il ne prend pas en compte les arguments d'une alimentation naturelle et bio qui demeure un mouvement important en Grande-Bretagne.

United Dairies, entreprise née de la fusion de quelques laiteries de moindre importance en 1915 et basée dans le Wiltshire, devint l'une des plus grandes laiteries du Royaume-Uni dans les années 50. L'entreprise s'engagea dans la vente de lait pasteurisé dès les années 1920. Cette société eut également beaucoup recours aux "trains laitiers" (comme son concurrent, Express Milk) pour acheminer le lait jusqu'à Londres.

Structuring elements of the film

  • Reporting footage  : No.
  • Set footage  : No.
  • Archival footage  : No.
  • Animated sequences  : No.
  • Intertitles  : No.
  • Host  : No.
  • Voice-over  : Yes.
  • Interview  : No.
  • Music and sound effects : Yes.
  • Images featured in other films : No.

How does the film direct the viewer’s attention?

The film takes the spectator to the pastures and dairy farms, to the milking rooms, along the roads and rails to the depots and bottling plants. By following the “way” of the milk from the cow to the doorstep, each step of milk processing is explained, with particular emphasis on testing schemes and pasteurisation. Not only does the film “convert” the doubtful spectator, but also illustrates what large dairies, like United Dairies, do.

The film is framed by the milk delivery service. The film opens with the milkman arriving at Mrs Harris doorstep, her scepticism of scientific and hygienic processing of milk opens the theme of the film. And between each informational scene or clip, the camera returns to Mrs Harris and her scepticism. <br /

There are three voices that narrate the film. One takes the spectator through the production of milk and the other details more scientific processes, and the third is that of the milk man who opens the film and near the end of the film explains the consumer’s role.

(français)
Le film emmène le spectateur dans les pâturages et les fermes laitières, dans les salles de traite, sur les routes et les rails qui mènent aux dépôts et aux usines d'embouteillage. En suivant la "voie lactée", de la vache jusqu'au pas de la porte du consommateur, chaque étape du traitement du lait est expliqué, avec une insistance particulière sur les programmes de tests et la pasteurisation. Le film ne se contente pas "convertir" le spectateur dubitatif, il illustre également le fonctionnement de grandes laiteries comme United Dairies.

C'est la livraison du lait qui sert de fil rouge au film. Il s'ouvre sur le laitier qui arrive devant chez Mme Harris. Le scepticisme de cette dernière en ce qui concerne le traitement scientifique et hygiénique du lait ouvre la thématique du film. Après chaque scène informationnelle, la caméra revient sur Mme Harris et son scepticisme. Les interlocuteurs de Mme Harris n'entrent pas du tout dans son jeu et ne font pas écho à ses propos véhéments. Ainsi, sa voisine ne réagit absolument pas à ses remarques. Quant à son mari, il reste dissimulé derrière son journal pendant tout le plan ǃ Cette absence de réaction renforce le message que veut faire passer le film sur le fait qu'un certain nombre de conceptions concernant le lait sont erronées.

Le commentaire est dit par trois voix différentes. L'une explique au spectateur la production du lait, la deuxième détaille les processus plus scientifiques tandis que la troisième est celle du laitier sur qui le film s'ouvre. Vers la fin du film, c'est lui qui explique le rôle du consommateur.

How are health and medicine portrayed?

Health and medicine are present in the film as the motivation or argument for the processing of milk. That is, through processing, milk is pasteurised and repeatedly tested to make it safe for consumers and herein reduce infant mortality. The film does not discuss nutrition. There are multiple scenes of bacteriology laboratories, which figure as pivotal places in the milk production.

(français)
Dans ce film, la santé et la médecine sont les éléments qui motivent ou justifient le traitement du lait. En effet, la pasteurisation du lait et les tests répétés qu'il subit en font un aliment sans danger, ce qui contribue à réduire la mortalité infantile. Il n'est absolument pas question de nutrition. Nombreuses sont les scènes tournées dans des laboratoires de bactériologie dont le rôle dans la production du lait est fondamental.

Broadcasting and reception

Where is the film screened?

No information. However, in the film, the milkman gives a brochure advertising the free screening of a film to Mrs Harris. It can herein be deduced that this film was likely made available for free screenings, perhaps by women’s groups or community centres or schools, as were many sponsored films.

(français)
Aucune information disponible. Cependant, dans le film, le laitier donne à Mme Harris une brochure d'informations concernant la projection gratuite d'un film. On peut en déduire que ce film a probablement fait l'objet de projections gratuites, peut-être organisées par des groupes de femmes, des foyers municipaux ou des écoles, comme ce fut le cas de nombreux films de commande.

Presentations and events associated with the film

(français)

Audience


Local, national, or international audience

National

Description

The milkman and the battleaxe (00:00-01:30 )

The scene opens with the milkman delivering glass bottles of milk with a three-wheel Brush Pony electric milk float (1947 three-wheel vehicle) to the doorsteps of terraced houses on a residential street in urban Britain. The voiceover promptly begins speaking of hygiene, “The milky way flows from the breeding of fine cattle through the hygienic and scientific treatment of the milk to the daily delivery by the milk roundsman.” The camera zooms in on the milkman as he notes on the delivery he has just made, but he is interrupted by Mrs Harris, the next customer, impatient for her delivery. He proudly presents her with “One pint of full cream milk fully tested for butterfat and adulteration, pasteurised to kill all dangerous bacteria and delivered to your doorstep in an airtight sterilised bottle.” (This sentence captures what the United Dairies is selling, although the name of the dairy is not overtly visible in the film yet.) She expresses disdain at machines and recalls when she was young they just had “honest to goodness milk.”

“To ensure that healthy state of affairs” (01:30-03:50)
As the milkman returns to his vehicle and drives off, the narrator proposes to show just how much is done to ensure that milk is “a clean wholesome product.” The scene shifts away from the residential street, to milk itself. It is poured from the milk churn into a tank and then from a bottle into a glass, the black and white film focuses on the clean white image of milk (as a side note, many films have revelled in this, perhaps most famously the creamer scene in Sergei Eisenstein’s The General Line, 1929, Russia) as the narrator gives statistics on milk consumption in Britain (3 to 4 million gallons per day). As we see children sipping milk from small bottles in front of a brick building, presumably a school, in a scene common to films on milk but also on social welfare (i.e., Enough to Eat, 1936), the voiceover declares (or reminds) that it is “one of the richest and most nourishing of all our daily foods.” In contrast to the smiling children, the narrator underlines the danger that milk can present. The scene shifts to a laboratory, where two lab workers – a man and a woman – manipulate test tubes and pipettes. We hear how pasteurisation solves the dilemma of destroying harmful bacteria without destroying food value. The effect of this is then demonstrated in an animated graph representation of infant mortality rates between 1911 and 1941, with the decrease attributed to improved housing, sanitation, post-natal care and food hygiene. Here, the benefits of drinking milk and of pasteurizing it are argued. It is underlined that the 1911 infantile diarrhoea outbreak causing 203/1000 deaths can be blamed on raw cow’s milk and that with the school milk programmes during the war children gained half an inch (1.27cm) in height and 2 pounds (1kg) in weight.

The farmer and the veterinarian (03:50-06:40)
A line of glistening milk bottles glides across the screen, presumably in a bottling plant. The provision of safe pure milk requires “intricate and highly skilled organisation,” states the voiceover. This marks the next part of film, which will detail the involvement of farmers, scientists and dairymen. (That United Dairies is able to orchestrate such organisation is herein implied, as well as the idea that the farmers, scientists and dairymen are only as efficient as the body that coordinates them.) A close-up of a man gazing into the distance, a farmer, then huddled over a milk can. A zoom in on the label on the can allows us to read “Accredited Milk”. In the background, we see farm workers and tractors in the farmyard and cows in the pasture beyond the gate. The narrator emphasises the necessity of healthy cows and hygienic milking conditions, without which pasteurisation “would be useless”. This statement speaks directly to the argument against pasteurisation, of that time, that by pasteurising milk poor or dirty milk could be made fit for sale. The scene shifts between cows in a rather muddy plot to others in a grassy field, just as he states the words “hygienic conditions.” To detail the farmer’s job, there is a change in narrator. The farmer, standing at the gate speaking to another man, we are told can get expert advice from the Ministry of Agriculture and the County Committee, as well as advisors appointed to the dairies that he delivers his milk to. The scene shifts to another farmer standing next to a couple of bulls, also talking with someone. The narrator goes on to the important tasks of raising a good herd, the camera pans pastoral scenes of British farmland and cow herds. Then the cows are shown inside a low-ceilinged barn and in a cement-floored courtyard. The veterinarian also plays an important role, we are told, notably with regard to tuberculosis, contagious abortion and mastitis.

The cows: the breed and the feed (06:40-08:22)
The film then goes on to cow breeds and food. The narrator underlines that the food cows are given is particularly important in producing milk. We are struck by the deadpan narration, as a joke is attempted, “The cow has always said: Go west, young woman, go west” as a map of Britain is used to illustrate the Western counties where pastures are richer and milk yields are higher. The different breeds, including Guernsey, Jersey, Shorthorns, Friesians and Ayrshire, are all shown, although without close-up shots or colour, they are not clearly distinguishable from one another. The cow’s diet is largely grass. A farmer fills a bucket and pours feed into the trough in the barn, with what the narrator explains might be hay, turnip, mangles, kale, oats and other foods, in proportion to how much milk they are producing.

“Good honest dirt” (08:23-09:15)
Like an ironic interlude from the dry, yet informative, narration, Mrs Harris narrates the view of an unkempt, hay-strewn barn where a farmer in a particularly dirty apron milks some manure-caked cows. She expresses her scepticism to her neighbour over the hedge separating their gardens, re-telling her conversation with the milkman and asking, “what’s wrong with good honest dirt, I want to know.”

The milk (09:15-14:00)
This interlude sets the scene for the main narrator to emphasize the four rules of modern safe milking “clean cows, sterile utensils, clean hands, and immediate cooling.” As it is shown how these can be obtained in the barn set-up and the methods to clean the cow and the herdsmen, the camera frames the task being performed. The milking process is similarly explained, with the clean overall of the herdsman glowing white against the darker tones of the hay and the cows. The camera zooms in on the strip cup as the foremilk is examined for signs of mastitis. And zooms in on a paper hanging on the wall as the herdsman fills in a chart, Minnie produced 27 ½ lbs of milk on May 9, 1948. The screen focuses on the details that the viewer is meant to retain.
The scene shifts to outside the farm gates. Milk churns are aligned on a raised wood platform. The platform, we see, is the exact height of the lorry bed and this facilitates the loading of the full churns and the unloading of the clean empty churns. Once again, the camera zooms in on the Accredited Milk label – the label that attests the milk was obtained from “healthy cows under the best hygienic conditions.” The farmer has done his job; he has produced the milk in the proper sanitary conditions. Now it is up to the dairymen to do his job, “safely and quickly.” Short scenes of lorries with flat beds aligned with milk churns driving through rural landscapes takes the milk, and the viewer, to the county dairy depot.

The county depot (14:15-20:05)
The county dairy is described as, primordially, the point where the first round of testing of the milk takes place. The milk churns are unloaded and smelled by experienced workers, the first test. These workers, like the modern herdsman in the milking parlour and laboratory workers, wear white uniforms. Three paths through the depot are then traced. That of the milk that is considered good, that which is doubtful and that of the emptied churns.
The milk that passes this test is poured into a tank and makes a quick journey through the depot – the rapidity of the process is stressed as time and temperature are of the essence. Milk is pumped through a cooler to near freezing and then to glass-lined (the glass acting as an insulator) or stainless steel 3000 gallon railroad tanks, which will transport the milk to the urban processing depots. United Dairies notably used the railroad to transport milk.
The milk that does not pass the test is sent to the county depot laboratory where further tests are performed: Resazurin test to see if it will keep, Phenolphthalein to measure the acidity to determine if it is beginning to sour, and the routine Gerber test to measure butterfat content.
The narrator changes and we now follow the empty churns. They are washed and sterilized. The laboratory workers – the same women that we saw in the laboratory – periodically leave the laboratory bench to test and monitor the inside of random churns to verify sterilisation. The tubing throughout the depot is also fully sterilised regularly.

"Pasteurisation" (20:05-21:00)
Another interlude featuring Mrs Harris introduces the next segment. Standing outside with a milk bottle in her hand, she expresses her doubts of the need for pasteurisation, speaking to someone sitting behind a newspaper, assumingly her husband.
This is followed by an explanation of pasteurisation and of Louis Pasteur’s “discovery” and work in the 1870s on microorganisms, yeasts and bacteria that cause milk to sour. A bearded man in a white lab coat works in a laboratory; this may have been intended as an allusion to Pasteur.

The town processing depot (21:00-27:43)
In a wide shot, we see the milk tanker as it arrives at the loading docks of the processing depot. This is where pasteurisation will take place. The milk is handled with “industrial organisation”. The term “industrial” here might be intended to draw a line between the agrarian pastoral origin of the milk and the modern industrial processing of the milk, and although they are contrasted, they are complementary. The milk is tested and pumped into 3000 gallon storage tanks; any milk that fails the laboratory tests is returned to the county depot. As the narrator describes the methods of pasteurisation commonly used, the camera tracks the tanks and multiple pipes and tubing in the processing plant. The first method, High Temperature Short Time (HTST) involves milk being heated to a high temperature (162° Fahrenheit) for a short time (15 seconds) and is explained with an animated diagram of the heater, holder and cooler. The image shifts between the animated diagram and footage of the real set up. The milk is then pumped directly into the bottling plant. The second method, the Holder system, is described more succinctly as the milk being heated (to 145° Fahrenheit) and held at that temperature for 30 minutes. In both cases, milk is tested to monitor that pasteurisation has been efficiently carried out.
The narrator changes. A close-up shot of a few milk bottles, with black rubber stoppers and labelled “Sample” with a reference number, takes us into the laboratory. The camera zooms out and a woman in a white lab coat reaches for one of the bottles, shakes it and takes a sample with a pipette. As we watch her work, the narrator explains that phosphatase is destroyed by the pasteurisation process, after being treated with chemicals, the milk turns blue and the shade is matched to coloured disks that correspond to how much phosphatase remains. The lab worker finishes the test and writes something in a lab book. The black and white image cannot illustrate the blue hues, and it is a profile view of the lab worker as she looks through the comparator that demonstrates the comparison. This test - devised in 1934 in Great Britain and adopted officially in 1946 - is the only test that is fully explained in the film.
The voiceover shifts back to the earlier narrator as the scene leaves the laboratory and returns to the processing plant where a man in a white lab coat is hand-scrubbing the pasteurisation equipment (the plates of the regenerator). We are told how pasteurisation is the “only means of killing all pathogenic organisms and making milk safe.” The sterilisation of the equipment is shown and explained. That is, it isn’t sufficient to sterilise the milk, but every surface that the milk comes in contact with.

The central laboratory (27:43-28:32)
A shot of the exterior of a building shows we’ve left the processing depot and will now visit the United Dairies Central Laboratory. This laboratory oversees the laboratory work at each of the depots. We see lab workers, all female and dressed in white, working with test tubes and Bunsen burners with petri dishes spread out before them. The laboratory also houses a centre for research and a (lovely wood panelled) library to advise scientists, dairy men and farmers. Milk is also tested here for adulteration by measuring the freezing point.

St Mary’s Hospital (28:32-29:04)
The front steps and door of St Mary’s Hospital is framed on the screen as a man enters carrying a crate of milk bottles. Again, we see a woman working in a laboratory, here, where milk is further tested regularly for a tubercle test. The narrator explains, somewhat proudly, that in 12 years not a single sample has tested positive – a tribute to pasteurisation. Local authorities also take samples for testing. Here a man fills out paperwork, which the camera zooms in on to reveal is a certificate for phosphatase tests in the Metropolitan Borough of Hammersmith. These tests, we are told, are independent checks on the working of the dairy.

The bottling plant (29:05-30:56)
A view from above the automated bottling machinery, like small carousels of milk bottles going around and around as they are filled. Here there is music in the background, gradually increasing in volume. They, we are told and shown, handle all bottle sizes, from 1/3 pint for schools to 1 quart. Like a parade, the bottles sealed with an aluminium cover march by and we clearly hear the symphony that accompanies them, the hands of the workers only used to take them from the line to the crate. Conveyer belts take them to the loading dock, where they are loaded into insulated lorries to be delivered to distribution depots. Again, as we followed the milk tankers to the depot, we see the trucks driving down the motorway in the dark, to arrive just before the roundsmen set out on their house deliveries. The delivery vans vary from horse drawn to electric trucks. Notably, we see the roundsman that will deliver to Mrs Harris ready to go. The milk is delivered, but the empty bottles are also collected. The symphonic music begins in the bottling plant and ends as the milk man

The bottles (30:56-34:32)
Once we see this milk man sitting in his electric delivery van, his voice takes over the narration. “Bottles” he states pointedly, as we see a hand set two clean empty bottles on a doorstep. This is the role of the consumer in delivering safe milk. (We are shown a sign over the door, but it is illegible, perhaps reading “The Gables”.) From the doorstep, we enter the kitchen as the scene shifts to the opening of the refrigerator door. A hand places a bottle of milk in the refrigerator. The milk man indicates that this housewife is “sensible” keeping milk in the refrigerator or a “homemade refrigerator” by keeping the milk bottle wrapped in a wet flannel in a large bowl of cold water, herein demonstrating the technique for those who might not have a refrigerator. Another doorstep appears on the screen, with two empty dirty bottles. Again, we are shown a sign, this one reads “Mon Repos”. These bottles “tell” the story of an “aimless” housewife, who means well, but doesn’t use her “common sense” and we watch her bewilderedly put the milk bottle haphazardly on the top of the kitchen stove. Unrinsed bottles are stained and dirty, a breeding ground for dangerous germs, he stresses as again we see a hand placing dirty bottles on the doorstep. Rhetorically, yet deliberately, the narrator asks “Who would return bottles in this state?” The camera turns upwards and we see, not the “aimless” housewife of the previous scene, but Mrs Harris, gleaming down at the camera, and the milk man, who picks up the bottles. We watch his cheerful face, in a close-up shot, as he explains that back at the depot they’ll be put aside to be specially washed and sterilized and tested for bacteria. He gives her a flyer from between the pages of his delivery book, for a film show called “The Milky Way” to tell her all about his job, the farmers and the chemists. Her irascibility continues as she replies “Who’d ‘ave thought I’d have to go to the pictures to see what cows on the farm look like. Still it is something for nothing.” The milk man, emphatically, explains that unfortunately Mrs Harris is not the only one. We then see a number of with filthy, dirty, opaque bottles, and bottles containing straws on doorsteps; against a black backdrop a hand shows a bottle with a chestnut in it; a tool shed with a milk bottle filled with paint; a dainty table with a milk bottle vase. These bottles are out of the circuit. The milk man is back at the depot and puts Mrs Harris’ two dirty bottles in a wire crate off to one side of the loading dock.
The earlier narrator then takes us through the depot again, this time following the path of the clean empties as they are loaded by hand onto an automated machine. They emerge clean and sparkling and go into the filling room. The image of the parade of sparkling bottles moving away from the camera fades into an image of a parade of white milk bottles moving toward the camera.

“The milky way flows on.” (34:33-35:28)

The film comes to a close as the narrator takes us through short scenes to revisit the “milky way” – from the healthy herd, to the milk churns to the lorry to the county depot and to town, through the tubes of the pasteurising machine, the laboratory tests, the bottling rooms to the distributing depots and the delivery round into the awaiting hands of a smiling Mrs Harris who has proudly set out two clean bottles on her doorstep. Effectively, it is as if the camera fast-forwarded through to the next day, and we meet a new, informed Mrs Harris. That is, the film worked, Mrs Harris went to the film show, was enlightened and changes her ways.

(français)
Le laitier et la mégère (00:00-01:30 )

La scène s'ouvre sur un laitier qui livre des bouteilles de lait en verre avec un triporteur à lait électrique Pink (véhicule à trois roues de 1947) sur le seuil de maisons en bandes dans un quartier résidentiel britannique. La voix off commence aussitôt à parler d'hygiène : « la voie lactée prend sa source dans l’élevage d’un bétail de qualité. Elle passe par un traitement hygiénique et scientifique du lait jusqu'à la livraison quotidienne par le laitier. » (The milky way flows from the breeding of fine cattle through the hygienic and scientific treatment of the milk to the daily delivery by the milk roundsman. ) La caméra effectue un zoom avant sur le laitier au moment où il inscrit la livraison qu'il vient de faire, mais il est interrompu par Mme Harris, la cliente suivante, qui attend son lait avec impatience. Il lui donne fièrement « une pinte de lait entier, dont le taux de matière grasse et la pureté ont été testés, pasteurisé pour tuer toutes les bactéries dangereuses et livré à votre porte dans une bouteille stérilisée hermétique ». (One pint of full cream milk fully tested for butterfat and adulteration, pasteurised to kill all dangerous bacteria and delivered to your doorstep in an airtight sterilised bottle.) (Cette phrase résume le message des United Dairies, bien que le nom de la laiterie ne soit pas encore visible dans le film.) Mme Harris exprime son mépris des machines et se rappelle que, quand dans sa jeunesse, ils avaient juste « du lait sans chichi » (honest to goodness milk).

« Pour garantir cette salubrité » (01:30-03:50)
Tandis que le laitier retourne dans son véhicule et s'en va, le narrateur propose de montrer au spectateur tout ce qui est fait pour s’assurer que le lait soit « un produit hygiénique et sain ». La caméra quitte le quartier résidentiel de Mme Harris pour se braquer sur le lait lui-même. Il est versé d’un bidon dans un réservoir puis d'une bouteille dans un verre. Le film noir et blanc se centre sur la blancheur du lait (accessoirement, de nombreux films ont pris un grand plaisir à faire de même, la scène la plus célèbre de ce type étant probablement la scène du crémier dans La Ligne générale de Sergei Eisenstein, 1929, Russie). En même temps, le narrateur donne des statistiques sur la consommation de lait en Grande-Bretagne (13 à 16 millions de litres par jour). Dans une scène commune aux films sur le lait mais aussi sur l’aide sociale (exemple : Enough to Eat, 1936), des enfants sirotent du lait dans de petites bouteilles devant un bâtiment en brique qui est probablement une école. En même temps, la voix off affirme (ou nous rappelle) que le lait est « l’un de nos aliments quotidiens les plus riches et les plus nourrissants » (one of the richest and most nourishing of all our daily foods.). Elle souligne ensuite les dangers que le lait peut représenter, ce qui contraste avec le sourire des enfants.
Nouvelle scène : dans un laboratoire, deux laborantins – un homme et une femme – manipulent des tubes à essai et des pipettes. La voix off explique comment la pasteurisation permet de résoudre un dilemme : tuer les bactéries nocives sans détruire la valeur nutritionnelle du lait. Les effets de cette méthode sont mis en évidence par un graphique animé montrant les taux de mortalité infantile entre 1911 et 1941. La diminution de ce taux est attribuée à l'amélioration des conditions de logement et des installations sanitaires, aux soins donnés aux nourrissons et à l'hygiène alimentaire. Les bénéfices qu'il y a à boire du lait et à le pasteuriser sont discutés. La voix off insiste sur le fait d'une part, que l'épidémie de diarrhée infantile qui causa 20,3 % de décès en 1911 fut causée par du lait de vache cru et d'autre part que, pendant la guerre, les enfants ont grandi en moyenne de 1,27 cm et pris 1 kg grâce aux programmes de distribution de lait dans les écoles.

Le fermier et le vétérinaire (03:50-06:40)
Une ligne de bouteilles de lait scintille en passant devant nos yeux, vraisemblablement dans une usine d'embouteillage. Pour fournir du lait pur et sans danger, une "organisation complexe et hautement qualifiée" (intricate and highly skilled) est nécessaire, affirme la voix off. C'est le début d'une nouvelle séquence du film qui détaille le rôle des fermiers, des scientifiques et des laitiers. (Le film sous-entend ici que United Dairies est capable de mettre en œuvre toute cette organisation, et que l'efficacité des fermiers, des scientifiques et des laitiers dépend de celle de l'organisme qui les coordonne.) Gros plan sur un homme, un fermier, en train de regarder au loin puis que l'on retrouve penché sur un bidon de lait. Un zoom avant sur l'étiquette du bidon nous permet de lire les mots Accredited Milk ("Lait agréé"). En arrière-plan, on voit des fermiers et des tracteurs dans la cour de la ferme, ainsi que des vaches au pré, de l'autre côté de la barrière. Le narrateur insiste sur la nécessité que les vaches soient en bonne santé et traites dans de bonnes conditions d'hygiène sans lesquelles la pasteurisation serait "vaine" (useless). Cette affirmation répond directement à l'argument des adversaires de la pasteurisation de l'époque selon lequel la pasteurisation pourrait permettre de vendre un lait de mauvaise qualité ou impur.
La caméra passe de vaches sur un terrain assez boueux à un pré herbeux au moment où les mots hygienic conditions ("conditions d'hygiène") sont prononcés. Changement de narrateur au moment d'expliciter le travail du fermier. Ce dernier, que l'on voit debout à la barrière en train de discuter avec un autre homme, peut bénéficier de conseils d'experts du ministère de l'Agriculture, du County Committee (comité du comté) ainsi que de la part de conseillers rattachés aux laiteries auxquelles il livre son lait. La caméra passe à un deuxième homme debout à côté de quelques taureaux et également en train de discuter avec un autre homme. Le narrateur évoque l'importance d'élever un bon troupeau tandis que la caméra fait un panoramique sur des scènes pastorales britanniques et des troupeaux de vaches. Plan sur des vaches dans une étable à plafond bas et dans une cour dont le sol est en ciment. Le vétérinaire est mentionné, il joue également un rôle important, notamment en ce qui concerne la tuberculose, les avortements contagieux et la mammite.

Les vaches ː races et alimentation (06:40-08:22)
Le film passe ensuite aux races de bétail et à leur alimentation. Le narrateur souligne le rôle que joue l'alimentation des vaches dans la production de lait. Le spectateur est frappé par le ton pince-sans-rire du narrateur qui tente une plaisanterie ː "La vache a toujours dit ː Va vers l'Ouest, jeune femme, va vers l'Ouest ǃ". Une carte de la Grande-Bretagne apparaît au même moment. Elle sert à montrer les comtés de l'ouest où les pâturages sont plus riches et les quantités de lait produites plus importantes. Les différentes races (guernesey, jersiaise, shorthorn, frisonne et airshire) sont toutes montrées, même si en l'absence de gros plan ou de couleur, il est difficile de les distinguer les unes des autres. La vache se nourrit en grande partie d'herbe. Un fermier remplit un seau et remplit l'auge de l'étable. Le narrateur explique qu'il peut s'agir de foin, de navets, de betteraves fourragères, de choux frisés, d'avoine et d'autres aliments, en fonction des quantités de lait produites par les vaches.

"Un peu de saleté n'a jamais fait de mal à personne, voyons ǃ"(08:23-09:15)
Comme un interlude ironique dans un commentaire informatif un peu aride, Mme Harris raconte ses souvenirs d'enfance à la ferme. Ses propos sont renforcés par une séquence tournée dans une grange mal entretenue et jonchée de paille où un fermier portant un tablier particulièrement sale trait des vaches maculées de fumier séché. Elle exprime son scepticisme à sa voisine par dessus la haie qui sépare leurs jardins en lui racontant sa conversation avec le laitier et en s'exclamant ː "Un peu de saleté n'a jamais fait de mal à personne, voyons ǃ"

Le lait (09:15-14:00)
Cet interlude a préparé le terrain pour que le narrateur principal puisse souligner les quatre règles de base de la traite moderne ː "des vaches propres, des ustensiles stériles, des mains propres et un refroidissement immédiat." La caméra se focalise sur chacun de ces aspects, sur la façon de les mettre en œuvre dans l'étable et sur les méthodes de nettoyage des vaches et des vachers. Le processus de la traite est expliqué de même, tandis que la blouse propre du vacher éclate de blancheur sur le fond plus sombre que composent les vaches et le foin. Zoom sur la tasse-filtre au moment où les premiers jets de lait sont examinés pour vérifier qu'il n'y a pas de signe de mammite. Nouveau zoom sur un papier accroché au mur. Le vacher remplit un tableau ː Minnie a produit 27 ½ lbs (soit environ 12,5 L) de lait le 9 mai 1948. La caméra est toujours braquée sur les éléments que le spectateur est censé retenir.
Nouvelle scène, au-delà des barrières qui entourent la ferme. Des bidons de lait sont posés sur une plateforme en bois exactement à la même hauteur que le plateau du camion, ce qui facilite le chargement des bidons pleins ainsi que le déchargement des bidons propres et vides. Nouveau zoom sur l'étiquette Accredited Milk qui atteste que le lait a été produit par des "vaches en bonne santé et dans les meilleures conditions d'hygiène" (healthy cows under the best hygienic conditions). Le fermier a accompli sa tâche, il a produit le lait dans les conditions sanitaires adéquates. À présent, c'est au tour des laitiers de faire leur travail "en toute sécurité et rapidement" (safely and quickly). Courtes scènes montrant des camions à plate-forme transportant des bidons de lait alignés traversant des paysages ruraux pour amener le lait, et le spectateur, jusqu'au dépôt de lait du comté.

Le dépôt du comté (14:15-20:05)
La laiterie du comté est décrite comme étant, avant tout, l'endroit où le lait est soumis à la première série de tests. Les bidons de lait sont déchargés. Premier test ː des employés expérimentés les sentent. Ces employés, comme les vachers modernes dans la salle de traite et les laborantins, portent des uniformes blancs. À partir de là, le spectateur suit trois trajectoires possibles ː celle du lait considéré comme bon, celle du lait douteux et celle des bidons qui ont été vidés.
Le lait qui a satisfait au premier test est versé dans une cuve et traverse rapidement le dépôt - le commentaire insiste sur cette rapidité et sur la température qui sont toutes deux des éléments essentiels. Le lait est pompé dans un refroidisseur et amené à une température avoisinant le point de congélation. Ensuite, il est transféré dans des wagons-citernes doublés de verre (qui sert d'isolant) ou en acier inoxydable, d'une capacité d'environ 13 600 L. Ces wagons le transporteront jusqu'aux grandes usines urbaines de traitement du lait. Il est intéressant de noter que United Dairies acheminait le lait par le train.
Le lait qui n'a pas satisfait au premier test est envoyé au laboratoire du dépôt du comté où il fait l'objet d'autres tests ː le test à la résazurine pour voir s'il se conservera, le test à la phénolphtaléine pour mesurer son taux d'acidité et déterminer s'il a commencé à tourner et le test de routine Gerber pour mesurer le taux de matière grasse du lait.
Le narrateur change et nous suivons à présent les bidons vides. Ils sont lavés et stérilisés. Les laborantines - il s'agit des mêmes femmes que celles que nous avons déjà vues dans le laboratoire - quittent périodiquement leur paillasse pour tester et contrôler de façon aléatoire l'intérieur des bidons afin de vérifier la stérilisation. L'ensemble des tuyaux qui traversent le dépôt est également stérilisé régulièrement.

"La pasteurisation" (20:05-21:00)
Nouvel interlude en compagnie de Mme Harris. Debout à l'extérieur avec une bouteille de lait vide à la main, elle exprime ses doutes à propos de la nécessité de la pasteurisation en s'adressant à une personne assise (probablement son mari) et dissimulée par un journal.
Il s'ensuit une explication de la pasteurisation, de la "découverte" de Pasteur et de son travail, dans les années 1870, sur les micro-organismes, les levures et les bactéries qui font tourner le lait. Un homme barbu en blouse blanche travaille dans un laboratoire ; ce plan se veut peut-être une allusion à Pasteur.

L'usine de traitement du lait de la ville(21:00-27:43)
Plan large montrant une citerne de lait qui arrive sur l'aire de chargement/déchargement de l'usine. C'est ici que la pasteurisation aura lieu. Le lait est traité selon une "organisation industrielle" (industrial organisation). Il est fort possible que le terme "industriel" soit employé ici pour détacher le traitement industriel moderne du lait de ses origines champêtres. Cependant, bien que ces deux phases soient mises en opposition, elles sont complémentaires. Le lait est testé et pompé dans une cuve de stockage de 13 620 L. Le lait qui ne satisfait pas aux analyses pratiquées en laboratoire est systématiquement retourné au dépôt du comté. La voix off décrit les méthodes de pasteurisation les plus courantes tandis que la caméra suit au fur et à mesure les cuves et multiples tuyaux de l'usine. La première méthode, la pasteurisation ultra rapide à haute température, nécessite de porter le lait à une température élevée (72° C) pendant un temps court (15 s) comme l'explique un schéma animé du pasteurisateur, du chambreur et du refroidisseur. Tout de suite après l'animation, l'image passe à l'installation réelle. Ensuite, le lait est acheminé directement vers l'usine d'embouteillage par pompage. Le second méthode, dite méthode de Holder, est décrite plus succinctement. Elle consiste à porter le lait à 63° C et à le maintenir à cette température pendant 30 min. Dans les deux cas, le lait est testé pour vérifier que la pasteurisation a bien fonctionné.
Changement de narrateur. Un gros plan sur quelques bouteilles de lait avec des bouchons en caoutchouc noir et une étiquette portant le mot Sample ("spécimen") et un numéro d'identification, fait entrer le spectateur dans le laboratoire. Zoom arrière. Une femme en blouse blanche saisit l'une des bouteilles, l'agite et prélève un échantillon de lait avec une pipette. Pendant que nous la regardons travailler, le narrateur explique que la phosphatase est détruite par la pasteurisation. Après traitement par des produits chimiques, le lait devient bleu. Sa teinte est comparée à des nuanciers pour déterminer combien il contient encore de phosphatase. La laborantine termine son test et inscrit quelque chose dans un registre. L'image en noir et blanc ne peut pas rendre compte des différentes nuances de bleu, c'est donc une vue de profil de la laborantine en train de regarder à travers le nuancier qui montre comment se fait la comparaison. Ce test conçu en 1934 en Grande-Bretagne et adopté officiellement en 1946 est le seul test qui soit expliqué en entier dans le film.
Reprise par le narrateur précédent. On quitte le laboratoire pour revenir à l'usine de traitement du lait où un homme en blouse blanche est en train de récurer le matériel de pasteurisation (plaques du récupérateur de chaleur). Le spectateur apprend que la pasteurisation est "le seul moyen de détruire les organismes pathogènes et d'assurer la sécurité sanitaire du lait" (only means of killing all pathogenic organisms and making milk safe). La stérilisation du matériel est montrée et expliquée pour signifier qu'il ne suffit de stériliser le lait, il faut également stériliser toutes les surfaces avec lesquelles le lait entre en contact.

Le laboratoire central (27:43-28:32)
Un plan de l'extérieur d'un bâtiment montre que nous avons quitté l'usine de traitement du lait pour visiter le laboratoire central de United Dairies. Ce laboratoire supervise toutes les analyses et tous les tests réalisés dans chacun des dépôts. Des laborantines (il n'y a pas d'homme) vêtues de blanc manipulent des tubes à essai et des becs Bunsen. Des boîtes de Petri sont disposées devant elles. Le laboratoire abrite également un centre de recherches et une bibliothèque (aux murs couverts de belles boiseries) pour conseiller les scientifiques, les employés des laiteries et les fermiers. On vérifie aussi que le lait n'a pas été coupé en mesurant son point de congélation.

L'hôpital St Mary (28:32-29:04)
L'entrée de l'hôpital St Mary apparaît à l'écran. Un homme portant une caisse de bouteilles de lait y entre. Nouveau plan sur une laborantine au travail. Ici, le lait subit régulièrement un test supplémentaire, celui de la tuberculose. Le commentateur explique d'un ton assez fier qu'en 12 ans, aucun prélèvement n'a été testé positif, ce qui est une façon de reconnaitre les bienfaits de la pasteurisation. Les autorités locales prélèvent également des échantillons pour les analyser. À cet effet, un homme remplit des papiers. Un zoom avant permet au spectateur de constater qu'il s'agit d'un certificat de test de la phosphatase dans l'arrondissement de Hammersmith à Londres. Le narrateur explique que ces tests sont réalisés par des organismes indépendants pour contrôler le fonctionnement de la laiterie.

L'usine d'embouteillage (29:05-30:56)
Vue plongeante sur la machine d'embouteillage automatique. Les bouteilles de lait tournent comme sur de petits manèges pendant leur remplissage. Ici, on remarque un fond musical dont le volume augmente. La voix off explique et le spectateur voit en même temps que toutes les tailles de bouteilles passent par cette chaine, des bouteilles d'un tiers de pinte (environ 20 cl) pour les écoles jusqu'aux bouteilles d'un peu plus d'un litre. Les bouteilles fermées par un opercule en aluminium défilent en bon ordre, comme à la parade. Le spectateur entend clairement la symphonie qui les accompagne. Les mains des ouvriers ne servent qu'à saisir les bouteilles sur la chaine et à les ranger dans des caisses que des tapis roulants amènent jusqu'à l'aire de chargement. Là, les caisses sont chargées dans des camions calorifugés qui vont les livrer aux dépôts de distribution. Encore une fois, de même que nous avons suivi les citernes de lait en route vers le dépôt, nous voyons les camions rouler sur l'autoroute, de nuit, et arriver juste avant le départ des laitiers qui vont livrer le lait de maison en maison. Les moyens de locomotion utilisés pour ces livraisons varient du véhicule tiré par un cheval aux camionnettes électriques. La caméra s'attarde plus particulièrement sur le laitier qui va livrer son lait à Mme Harris. Il est prêt à partir. Non seulement les laitiers livrent le lait mais ils récupèrent également les bouteilles vides. La musique symphonique qui a débuté dans l'usine d'embouteillage s'arrête au moment où le laitier démarre sa tournée.

Les bouteilles (30:56-34:32)
Une fois le laitier installé dans son triporteur électrique, c'est sa voix qui poursuit la narration. "Les bouteilles", dit-il d'un ton plein de sous-entendus au moment où une main pose deux bouteilles propres sur le seuil d'une porte. C'est là que le consommateur a un rôle à jouer. (Un petit panneau quasiment illisible au-dessus de la porte indique le nom de la maison. C'est peut-être The Gables, c'est-à-dire "Les Pignons".) Après avoir passé le seuil de la porte, on entre directement dans la cuisine par l'intermédiaire d'un gros plan sur la porte du réfrigérateur qui s'ouvre. Une main y range une bouteille de lait. Le laitier signale que cette ménagère fait preuve de sens pratique en conservant le lait au réfrigérateur ou dans un réfrigérateur "artisanal", c'est-à-dire en plaçant la bouteille de lait enveloppée d'un torchon humide dans un saladier plein d'eau. Cette séquence sert de démonstration de la méthode aux spectateurs qui ne possèderaient pas de réfrigérateur chez eux.
Un autre pas-de-porte apparaît à l'écran, cette fois avec deux bouteilles vides et sales. Un autre panneau, cette fois-ci avec l'inscription "Mon repos". Ces bouteilles "racontent l'histoire" d'une ménagère brouillonne (aimless) qui a de bonnes intentions mais ne fait pas preuve de "bon sens" (common sense). Nous la voyons poser la bouteille de lait au-dessus de la cuisinière d'un air perplexe. La voix off poursuit en expliquant que les bouteilles qui ne sont pas rincées sont tachées et sales, et qu'elles constituent un milieu idéal pour le développement de dangereux microbes. En même temps, à l'écran, une main place deux bouteille sales sur un pas-de-porte. Le commentateur pose volontairement une question rhétorique ː "Qui se permettrait de rendre des bouteilles dans un état pareil ?" La caméra remonte pour révéler, non pas le visage de la ménagère brouillonne mais celui de Mme Harris qui jette un regard de défi à la caméra tandis que le laitier ramasse les bouteilles. Gros plan sur le visage enjoué de l'homme qui explique qu'au dépôt, ces bouteilles seront mises à part avant de subir un lavage spécial, une stérilisation et des analyses bactériologiques. Il prend dans son registre de livraison un prospectus qu'il tend à Mme Harris. Il s'agit de l'annonce de la projection d'un film intitulé The Milky Way qui parle de son travail, des fermiers et des chimistes. L’irascibilité de Mme Harris ne connait pas de borne car elle poursuit ː "Si on m'avait dit qu'il faudrait que j'aille au cinéma pour voir des vaches dans une ferme ǃ Enfin, du moment que c'est gratuit ǃ" (Who’d ‘ave thought I’d have to go to the pictures to see what cows on the farm look like. Still it is something for nothing.) Le laitier explique clairement que, malheureusement, Mme Harris n'est pas la seule à se comporter ainsi. Succession de plans montrant des bouteilles dégoutantes, sales et opaques ainsi que des bouteilles contenant des pailles posées sur des seuils de porte ; une main sur un fond noir montre une bouteille contenant une châtaigne ; une remise avec des outils et une bouteille contenant de la peinture ; une table dressée pour le thé avec une bouteille de lait servant de vase. Ces bouteilles ne sont plus dans le circuit. De retour au dépôt, le laitier place les deux bouteilles sales de Mme Harris dans une caisse métallique à part, d'un côté de l'aire de chargement.
Le narrateur précédent nous refait passer par le dépôt. Cette fois-ci, nous suivons les bouteilles vides propres qui sont placées à la main dans une machine automatique. Elles en ressortent propres et étincelantes puis passent au remplissage. Fondu enchainé ː le défilé des bouteilles étincelantes qui s'éloignent de la caméra laisse la place à un défilé de bouteilles de lait blanc qui progressent en direction de la caméra.

“La voie lactée continue à couler” (34:33-35:28)

Pour terminer, le narrateur nous fait de nouveau emprunter la "voie lactée" à travers de courtes scènes ː du troupeau de vaches en bonne santé en passant par les bidons de lait, le camion, le dépôt du comté, les tuyaux du pasteurisateur, les tests en laboratoire, les salles d'embouteillage, les dépôts de distribution et les tournées de livraison jusqu'aux mains d'une Mme Harris souriante qui a déposé fièrement deux bouteilles propres devant sa porte. On dirait que la caméra a fait une avance rapide sur toute la journée du lendemain. La "nouvelle" Mme Harris, souriante et avertie, que nous voyions à présent est la preuve que le film a atteint son but. Mme Harris est allée le voir et les informations qu'elle en a retiré l'ont incitée à changer de comportement.

Supplementary notes

(français)

References and external documents

Peter J. Atkins, 2000, “The pasteurization of England: The science, culture and health implications of milk processing, 1900-1950” in David F. Smith and Jim Philips, eds., Food, Science, Policy and Regulation in the Twentieth Century: International and Comparative Perspectives (Routledge: London and New York), 37-51.

H. D. Kay, 1950, “The National Institute for Research in Dairying, Shinfield, Reading.” Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series A, Mathematical and Physical Sciences, 205(1083), 453-467. URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/98697

“United Dairies” Wikipedia.org, URL: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Dairies (consulted 25 January 2021)

(français)
Peter J. Atkins, 2000, “The pasteurization of England: The science, culture and health implications of milk processing, 1900-1950” in David F. Smith and Jim Philips, eds., Food, Science, Policy and Regulation in the Twentieth Century: International and Comparative Perspectives (Routledge: London and New York), 37-51. H. D. Kay, 1950, “The National Institute for Research in Dairying, Shinfield, Reading.” Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series A, Mathematical and Physical Sciences, 205(1083), 453-467. URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/98697


Contributors

  • Record written by : Tricia Close-Koenig
  • Record translated into French by : Élisabeth Fuchs


Erc-logo.png Cette fiche a été rédigée et/ou traduite dans le cadre du projet BodyCapital, financé par l'European Research Council (ERC) et le programme de l'Union européenne pour la recherche et l'innovation Horizon 2020 (grant agreement No 694817).